Seasonal and regional short-term effects of fine particles on hospital admissions in 202 US counties, 1999-2005

Michelle L. Bell, Keita Ebisu, Roger Peng, Jemma Walker, Jonathan M. Samet, Scott Zeger, Francesca Dominici

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors investigated whether short-term effects of fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) on risk of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations among the elderly varied by region and season in 202 US counties for 1999-2005. They fit 3 types of time-series models to provide evidence for 1) consistent particulate matter effects across the year, 2) different particulate matter effects by season, and 3) smoothly varying particulate matter effects throughout the year. The authors found statistically significant evidence of seasonal and regional variation in estimates of particulate matter effect. Respiratory disease effect estimates were highest in winter, with a 1.05% (95% posterior interval: 0.29, 1.82) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5. Cardiovascular diseases estimates were also highest in winter, with a 1.49% (95% confidence interval: 1.09, 1.89) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5, with associations also observed in other seasons. The strongest evidence of a relation between PM2.5 and hospitalizations was in the Northeast for both respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity of PM2.5 effects on hospitalizations may reflect seasonal and regional differences in emissions and in particles' chemical constituents. Results can help guide development of hypotheses and further epidemiologic studies on potential heterogeneity in the toxicity of constituents of the particulate matter mixture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1301-1310
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume168
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

Particulate Matter
Hospitalization
Cardiovascular Diseases
Epidemiologic Studies
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Hospitalization
  • Medicare
  • Particulate matter
  • Seasons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Seasonal and regional short-term effects of fine particles on hospital admissions in 202 US counties, 1999-2005. / Bell, Michelle L.; Ebisu, Keita; Peng, Roger; Walker, Jemma; Samet, Jonathan M.; Zeger, Scott; Dominici, Francesca.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 168, No. 11, 12.2008, p. 1301-1310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, Michelle L. ; Ebisu, Keita ; Peng, Roger ; Walker, Jemma ; Samet, Jonathan M. ; Zeger, Scott ; Dominici, Francesca. / Seasonal and regional short-term effects of fine particles on hospital admissions in 202 US counties, 1999-2005. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2008 ; Vol. 168, No. 11. pp. 1301-1310.
@article{177faae69e3549bab34f17c36f0c1f17,
title = "Seasonal and regional short-term effects of fine particles on hospital admissions in 202 US counties, 1999-2005",
abstract = "The authors investigated whether short-term effects of fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) on risk of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations among the elderly varied by region and season in 202 US counties for 1999-2005. They fit 3 types of time-series models to provide evidence for 1) consistent particulate matter effects across the year, 2) different particulate matter effects by season, and 3) smoothly varying particulate matter effects throughout the year. The authors found statistically significant evidence of seasonal and regional variation in estimates of particulate matter effect. Respiratory disease effect estimates were highest in winter, with a 1.05{\%} (95{\%} posterior interval: 0.29, 1.82) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5. Cardiovascular diseases estimates were also highest in winter, with a 1.49{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval: 1.09, 1.89) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5, with associations also observed in other seasons. The strongest evidence of a relation between PM2.5 and hospitalizations was in the Northeast for both respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity of PM2.5 effects on hospitalizations may reflect seasonal and regional differences in emissions and in particles' chemical constituents. Results can help guide development of hypotheses and further epidemiologic studies on potential heterogeneity in the toxicity of constituents of the particulate matter mixture.",
keywords = "Air pollution, Hospitalization, Medicare, Particulate matter, Seasons",
author = "Bell, {Michelle L.} and Keita Ebisu and Roger Peng and Jemma Walker and Samet, {Jonathan M.} and Scott Zeger and Francesca Dominici",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1093/aje/kwn252",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "168",
pages = "1301--1310",
journal = "American Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0002-9262",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seasonal and regional short-term effects of fine particles on hospital admissions in 202 US counties, 1999-2005

AU - Bell, Michelle L.

AU - Ebisu, Keita

AU - Peng, Roger

AU - Walker, Jemma

AU - Samet, Jonathan M.

AU - Zeger, Scott

AU - Dominici, Francesca

PY - 2008/12

Y1 - 2008/12

N2 - The authors investigated whether short-term effects of fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) on risk of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations among the elderly varied by region and season in 202 US counties for 1999-2005. They fit 3 types of time-series models to provide evidence for 1) consistent particulate matter effects across the year, 2) different particulate matter effects by season, and 3) smoothly varying particulate matter effects throughout the year. The authors found statistically significant evidence of seasonal and regional variation in estimates of particulate matter effect. Respiratory disease effect estimates were highest in winter, with a 1.05% (95% posterior interval: 0.29, 1.82) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5. Cardiovascular diseases estimates were also highest in winter, with a 1.49% (95% confidence interval: 1.09, 1.89) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5, with associations also observed in other seasons. The strongest evidence of a relation between PM2.5 and hospitalizations was in the Northeast for both respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity of PM2.5 effects on hospitalizations may reflect seasonal and regional differences in emissions and in particles' chemical constituents. Results can help guide development of hypotheses and further epidemiologic studies on potential heterogeneity in the toxicity of constituents of the particulate matter mixture.

AB - The authors investigated whether short-term effects of fine particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) on risk of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations among the elderly varied by region and season in 202 US counties for 1999-2005. They fit 3 types of time-series models to provide evidence for 1) consistent particulate matter effects across the year, 2) different particulate matter effects by season, and 3) smoothly varying particulate matter effects throughout the year. The authors found statistically significant evidence of seasonal and regional variation in estimates of particulate matter effect. Respiratory disease effect estimates were highest in winter, with a 1.05% (95% posterior interval: 0.29, 1.82) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5. Cardiovascular diseases estimates were also highest in winter, with a 1.49% (95% confidence interval: 1.09, 1.89) increase in hospitalizations per 10-μg/m3 increase in same-day PM2.5, with associations also observed in other seasons. The strongest evidence of a relation between PM2.5 and hospitalizations was in the Northeast for both respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity of PM2.5 effects on hospitalizations may reflect seasonal and regional differences in emissions and in particles' chemical constituents. Results can help guide development of hypotheses and further epidemiologic studies on potential heterogeneity in the toxicity of constituents of the particulate matter mixture.

KW - Air pollution

KW - Hospitalization

KW - Medicare

KW - Particulate matter

KW - Seasons

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=57149107148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=57149107148&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/aje/kwn252

DO - 10.1093/aje/kwn252

M3 - Article

C2 - 18854492

AN - SCOPUS:57149107148

VL - 168

SP - 1301

EP - 1310

JO - American Journal of Epidemiology

JF - American Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0002-9262

IS - 11

ER -