Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association

American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since the 2002 American Heart Association scientific statement "Fish Consumption, Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Cardiovascular Disease," evidence from observational and experimental studies and from randomized controlled trials continues to emerge to further substantiate the beneficial effects of seafood long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. A recent American Heart Association science advisory addressed the specific effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events. This American Heart Association science advisory extends that review and offers further support to include n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from seafood consumption. Several potential mechanisms have been investigated, including antiarrhythmic, anti-inflammatory, hematologic, and endothelial, although for most, longer-term dietary trials of seafood are warranted to substantiate the benefit of seafood as a replacement for other important sources of macronutrients. The present science advisory reviews this evidence and makes a suggestion in the context of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and in consideration of other constituents of seafood and the impact on sustainability. We conclude that 1 to 2 seafood meals per week be included to reduce the risk of congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death, especially when seafood replaces the intake of less healthy foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e35-e47
JournalCirculation
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2018

Fingerprint

Seafood
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Cardiovascular Diseases
Nutrition Policy
Fish Oils
Sudden Cardiac Death
Observational Studies
Coronary Disease
Meals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Randomized Controlled Trials
Heart Failure
Stroke
Food

Keywords

  • AHA Scientific Statements
  • diet
  • fatty acids, unsaturated
  • seafood

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology (2018). Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association. Circulation, 138(1), e35-e47. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000574

Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease : A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association. / American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology.

In: Circulation, Vol. 138, No. 1, 03.07.2018, p. e35-e47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology 2018, 'Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association', Circulation, vol. 138, no. 1, pp. e35-e47. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000574
American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology. Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2018 Jul 3;138(1):e35-e47. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000574
American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology. / Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease : A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association. In: Circulation. 2018 ; Vol. 138, No. 1. pp. e35-e47.
@article{783a9a01e0994e99a18688c2a95d31d1,
title = "Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association",
abstract = "Since the 2002 American Heart Association scientific statement {"}Fish Consumption, Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Cardiovascular Disease,{"} evidence from observational and experimental studies and from randomized controlled trials continues to emerge to further substantiate the beneficial effects of seafood long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. A recent American Heart Association science advisory addressed the specific effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events. This American Heart Association science advisory extends that review and offers further support to include n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from seafood consumption. Several potential mechanisms have been investigated, including antiarrhythmic, anti-inflammatory, hematologic, and endothelial, although for most, longer-term dietary trials of seafood are warranted to substantiate the benefit of seafood as a replacement for other important sources of macronutrients. The present science advisory reviews this evidence and makes a suggestion in the context of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and in consideration of other constituents of seafood and the impact on sustainability. We conclude that 1 to 2 seafood meals per week be included to reduce the risk of congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death, especially when seafood replaces the intake of less healthy foods.",
keywords = "AHA Scientific Statements, diet, fatty acids, unsaturated, seafood",
author = "{American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Clinical Cardiology} and Rimm, {Eric B.} and Appel, {Lawrence J.} and Chiuve, {Stephanie E.} and Luc Djouss{\'e} and Engler, {Mary B.} and Kris-Etherton, {Penny M.} and Dariush Mozaffarian and Siscovick, {David S.} and Lichtenstein, {Alice H.}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1161/CIR.0000000000000574",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "138",
pages = "e35--e47",
journal = "Circulation",
issn = "0009-7322",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seafood Long-Chain n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Cardiovascular Disease

T2 - A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association

AU - American Heart Association Nutrition Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Council on Epidemiology and Prevention; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; and Council on Cli

AU - Rimm, Eric B.

AU - Appel, Lawrence J.

AU - Chiuve, Stephanie E.

AU - Djoussé, Luc

AU - Engler, Mary B.

AU - Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

AU - Mozaffarian, Dariush

AU - Siscovick, David S.

AU - Lichtenstein, Alice H.

PY - 2018/7/3

Y1 - 2018/7/3

N2 - Since the 2002 American Heart Association scientific statement "Fish Consumption, Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Cardiovascular Disease," evidence from observational and experimental studies and from randomized controlled trials continues to emerge to further substantiate the beneficial effects of seafood long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. A recent American Heart Association science advisory addressed the specific effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events. This American Heart Association science advisory extends that review and offers further support to include n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from seafood consumption. Several potential mechanisms have been investigated, including antiarrhythmic, anti-inflammatory, hematologic, and endothelial, although for most, longer-term dietary trials of seafood are warranted to substantiate the benefit of seafood as a replacement for other important sources of macronutrients. The present science advisory reviews this evidence and makes a suggestion in the context of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and in consideration of other constituents of seafood and the impact on sustainability. We conclude that 1 to 2 seafood meals per week be included to reduce the risk of congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death, especially when seafood replaces the intake of less healthy foods.

AB - Since the 2002 American Heart Association scientific statement "Fish Consumption, Fish Oil, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Cardiovascular Disease," evidence from observational and experimental studies and from randomized controlled trials continues to emerge to further substantiate the beneficial effects of seafood long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. A recent American Heart Association science advisory addressed the specific effect of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events. This American Heart Association science advisory extends that review and offers further support to include n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids from seafood consumption. Several potential mechanisms have been investigated, including antiarrhythmic, anti-inflammatory, hematologic, and endothelial, although for most, longer-term dietary trials of seafood are warranted to substantiate the benefit of seafood as a replacement for other important sources of macronutrients. The present science advisory reviews this evidence and makes a suggestion in the context of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and in consideration of other constituents of seafood and the impact on sustainability. We conclude that 1 to 2 seafood meals per week be included to reduce the risk of congestive heart failure, coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death, especially when seafood replaces the intake of less healthy foods.

KW - AHA Scientific Statements

KW - diet

KW - fatty acids, unsaturated

KW - seafood

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049370866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85049370866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000574

DO - 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000574

M3 - Article

C2 - 29773586

AN - SCOPUS:85049370866

VL - 138

SP - e35-e47

JO - Circulation

JF - Circulation

SN - 0009-7322

IS - 1

ER -