Screening Juvenile Justice-Involved Females for Sexually Transmitted Infection: A Pilot Intervention for Urban Females in Community Supervision

Abigail A. Donaldson, Jessica Burns, Catherine P. Bradshaw, Jonathan M. Ellen, Jennifer Maehr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Little is known about Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC) rates in community-supervised juvenile justice-involved (CSJJI) females, or how to best provide screening for sexually transmitted infections in this population. A pilot intervention allowed case managers to offer optional CT/GC screening to CSJJI females during mandated visits. Anonymous satisfaction surveys and discussion groups assessed intervention acceptability. Case managers met with 514 CSJJI females; 102 (20%) agreed to screening and 117 tests were completed. Among those screened, 21 (18%) had CT and 3 (3%) had GC. Intervention feedback from case managers and clients was positive, but there were barriers to recruitment. Lessons learned from this case manager-facilitated intervention may increase the acceptability and effectiveness of future screening methods in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-268
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Correctional Health Care
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Keywords

  • community-based screening
  • juvenile justice health care
  • sexually transmitted infection screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Community and Home Care
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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