Screening for High Blood Pressure in Adults During Ambulatory Nonprimary Care Visits: Opportunities to Improve Hypertension Recognition

Joel Handler, Yasmina Mohan, Michael H. Kanter, Kristi Reynolds, Xia Li, Miki Nguyen, Deborah R. Young, Corinna Koebnick

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Visits with nonprimary care providers such as optometrists may be missed opportunities for the detection of high blood pressure (BP). For this study, normotensive adults with at least 12 months of health plan membership on January 1, 2009 (n=1,075,522) were followed-up for high BP through March 14, 2011. Of 111,996 patients with a BP measurement ≥140/90 mm Hg, 82.7% were measured during primary care visits and 17.3% during nonprimary care visits. Individuals with a BP ≥140/90 mm Hg measured during nonprimary care visits were older and more likely to be male and non-Hispanic white. The proportion of patients with follow-up and false-positives were comparable between primary and nonprimary care. The main nonprimary care specialty to identify a first BP ≥140/90 mm Hg was ophthalmology/optometry with 24.5% of all patients. Results suggest that expanding screening for hypertension to nonprimary care settings may improve the detection of hypertension.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)431-439
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
    Volume17
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Internal Medicine
    • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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