Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions

William J. Savage, Aaron A Tobian, Jessica H. Savage, Robert A Wood, John Thomas Schroeder, Paul Michael Ness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions that are the most common adverse reaction to platelets and plasma, occurring in up to 2% of transfusions. Despite the ubiquity of these reactions, little is known about their mechanism. In a small subset of severe reactions, specific antibody has been implicated as causal, although this mechanism does not explain all ATRs. Evidence suggests that donor, product, and recipient factors are involved, and it is possible that many ATRs are multifactorial. Further understanding of the mechanisms of ATRs is necessary so that rationally designed and cost-effective prevention measures can be developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1361-1371
Number of pages11
JournalTransfusion
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Hypersensitivity
Blood Platelets
Transfusion Reaction
Costs and Cost Analysis
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Scratching the surface of allergic transfusion reactions. / Savage, William J.; Tobian, Aaron A; Savage, Jessica H.; Wood, Robert A; Schroeder, John Thomas; Ness, Paul Michael.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 53, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 1361-1371.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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