Scholarly work products of the doctor of nursing practice: One approach to evaluating scholarship, rigour, impact and quality

Mary F. Terhaar, Martha Sylvia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims and objectives: The aim of this investigation was to evaluate, monitor and manage the quality of projects conducted and work produced as evidence of scholarship upon completion of Doctor of Nursing Practice education. Background: The Doctor of Nursing Practice is a relatively new degree which prepares nurses for high impact careers in diverse practice settings around the globe. Considerable variation characterises curricula across schools preparing Doctors of Nursing Practice. Accreditation assures curricula are focused on attainment of the Doctor of Nursing Practice essentials, yet outcomes have not been reported to help educators engage in programme improvement. This work has implications for nursing globally because translating strong evidence into practice is key to improving outcomes in direct care, leadership, management and education. The Doctor of Nursing Practice student learns to accomplish translation through the conduct of projects. Evaluating the rigour and results of these projects is essential to improving the quality, safety and efficacy of translation, improvements in care and overall system performance. Design: A descriptive study was conducted to evaluate the scholarly products of Doctor of Nursing Practice education in one programme across four graduating classes. Methods: A total of 80 projects, conducted across the USA and around the globe, are described using a modification of the Uncertainty, Pace, Complexity Model. Results: The per cent of students considered to have produced high quality work in relation to target expectations as well as the per cent that conducted means testing increased over the four study years. Conclusions: Evaluation of scope, complexity and rigour of scholarly work products has driven improvements in the curriculum and informed the work of faculty and advisors. Relevance to clinical practice: Methods, evaluation and outcomes conformed around a set of expectations for scholarship and rigour have resulted in measurable outcomes, and quality publications have increased over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-174
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume25
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Nursing
Curriculum
Nursing Education
Accreditation
Nursing Students
Uncertainty
Publications
Nurses
Students
Safety
Education

Keywords

  • Clinical nursing
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice
  • Education
  • Evaluation
  • Outcomes
  • Projects
  • Scholarship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Scholarly work products of the doctor of nursing practice : One approach to evaluating scholarship, rigour, impact and quality. / Terhaar, Mary F.; Sylvia, Martha.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 1-2, 01.01.2016, p. 163-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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