Salt sensitivity of blood pressure is accompanied by slow respiratory rate

results of a clinical feeding study

David E. Anderson, Beverly A. Parsons, Jessica D. McNeely, Edgar R Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Sleep-disordered breathing has been implicated in hypertension, but whether daytime breathing is a factor in blood pressure (BP) regulation has not been investigated to date. The present study sought to determine the role of breathing pattern in salt sensitivity of BP. Thirty-six women, ages 40 to 70, were placed on a 6-day low-sodium/low-potassium diet followed by a 6-day high-sodium/low-potassium diet. Breathing pattern at rest and 24-hour ambulatory BP were monitored at baseline and after each 6-day diet period. Respiratory rate (but not tidal volume or minute ventilation) was an inverse predictor of systolic (r = -0.50; P <.001) and diastolic (r = -0.59; P <.001) blood pressure sensitivity to high sodium intake. Respiratory rate was positively associated with hemoglobin (r = + 0.38; P <.01), and the salt-induced change in hemoglobin was associated with salt-induced change in BP (r = -0.35; P <.05). These findings indicate that a pattern of slow breathing not compensated by increased tidal volume is associated with salt sensitivity of BP in women. Breathing patterns could play a role in the hypertensive response via sustained effects on blood gases and acid-base balance, and/or be a marker for other biological factors mediating the cardiovascular response to dietary salt intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-263
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Hypertension
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Respiratory Rate
Salts
Respiration
Blood Pressure
Sodium-Restricted Diet
Tidal Volume
Potassium
Hemoglobins
Acid-Base Equilibrium
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Biological Factors
Ventilation
Clinical Studies
Gases
Sodium
Diet
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • hypertension
  • respiration
  • sodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Salt sensitivity of blood pressure is accompanied by slow respiratory rate : results of a clinical feeding study. / Anderson, David E.; Parsons, Beverly A.; McNeely, Jessica D.; Miller, Edgar R.

In: Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Vol. 1, No. 4, 07.2007, p. 256-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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