Salt excretory capacity in natives adapted to moderate high altitude living after acute mobilization to sea level

G. Ramirez, D. O. Pineda, P. A. Bittle, S. J. Agosti, H. A. Rabb, J. R. Dietz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The sodium excretory capacity of six normal subjects born and raised at moderately high altitude (2600 m) was evaluated at high altitude (HA), and after acute mobilization to sea level (SL). The ability of these individuals to respond to an acute salt load was evaluated by infusing a volume of 100 ml · m-2 body surface area (BSA) of 5% sodium chloride solution over a 30- min time period in both experimental conditions. HA natives were able to excrete a significantly greater salt load at HA than at SL (41.8% vs. 31.6%, respectively, p < 0.05) in 3 h. No changes in plasma atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) concentration were found in either experimental condition. Despite an increase in serum osmolality, no vasopressin (AVP) response was noted either at HA or SL. No correlation between serum AVP levels and urine c-AMP concentrations was found. The enhanced excretory response to a salt load at HA was not explained by the measured hormonal changes. The lack of AVP response to increased serum osmolality, both at HA and SL, in high altitude adapted subjects is presently unexplainable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1063-1070
Number of pages8
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume66
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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