Salivary cytokines as a minimally-invasive measure of immune functioning in young children: Correlates of individual differences and sensitivity to laboratory stress

Jenna L. Riis, Douglas A. Granger, Janet Ann DiPietro, Karen J Bandeen Roche, Sara Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is growing interest in minimally-invasive measures of environmentally-responsive biological systems in developmental science. Contributing to that endeavor, this study explores the intercorrelations, correlates, and task-sensitivity of proinflammatory salivary cytokines in childhood. Saliva was sampled from 125 healthy five-year old children (49% male) across a series of cognitive and emotional challenge laboratory tasks. Samples were assayed for cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα), and markers of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and autonomic nervous system (ANS) activation (salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase [sAA]). Cytokines were positively intercorrelated and task-sensitivity varied. Except IL-8, cytokines were elevated in children with oral health issues and tobacco smoke exposure. Among boys, cytokines were positively related to sAA and negatively related to cortisol. The findings suggest that in healthy children, salivary cytokine levels reflect compartmentalized oral immune activity. Associations between ANS and HPA activity and cytokines in saliva may present opportunities for minimally-invasive methods to explore neuroendocrine-immune interactions during development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-167
Number of pages15
JournalDevelopmental Psychobiology
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

Fingerprint

Individuality
Cytokines
Salivary alpha-Amylases
Hydrocortisone
Autonomic Nervous System
Interleukin-8
Saliva
Smokeless Tobacco
Oral Health
Interleukin-1
Smoke
Interleukin-6

Keywords

  • Acute stress
  • Children
  • Cortisol
  • Cytokines
  • Saliva
  • Salivary alpha-amylase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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title = "Salivary cytokines as a minimally-invasive measure of immune functioning in young children: Correlates of individual differences and sensitivity to laboratory stress",
abstract = "There is growing interest in minimally-invasive measures of environmentally-responsive biological systems in developmental science. Contributing to that endeavor, this study explores the intercorrelations, correlates, and task-sensitivity of proinflammatory salivary cytokines in childhood. Saliva was sampled from 125 healthy five-year old children (49{\%} male) across a series of cognitive and emotional challenge laboratory tasks. Samples were assayed for cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNFα), and markers of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and autonomic nervous system (ANS) activation (salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase [sAA]). Cytokines were positively intercorrelated and task-sensitivity varied. Except IL-8, cytokines were elevated in children with oral health issues and tobacco smoke exposure. Among boys, cytokines were positively related to sAA and negatively related to cortisol. The findings suggest that in healthy children, salivary cytokine levels reflect compartmentalized oral immune activity. Associations between ANS and HPA activity and cytokines in saliva may present opportunities for minimally-invasive methods to explore neuroendocrine-immune interactions during development.",
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