Safe Direct Current Stimulator design for reduced power consumption and increased reliability

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Current state of the art neural prosthetics, such as cochlear implants, spinal cord stimulators, and deep brain stimulators use implantable pulse generators (IPGs) to excite neural activity. Inhibition of neural firing is typically indirect and requires excitation of neurons that then have inhibitory projections downstream. Safe Direct Current Stimulator (SDCS) technology is designed to convert electronic pulses delivered to electrodes embedded within an implantable device to ionic direct current (iDC) at the output of the device. iDC from the device can then control neural extracellular potential with the intent of being able to not only excite, but also inhibit and sensitize neurons, thereby greatly expanding the possible applications of neuromodulation therapies and neural interface mechanisms. While the potential applications and proof of concept of this device have been the focus of previous work, the published descriptions of this technology leave significant room for power and reliability optimization. We describe and model a novel device construction designed to reduce power consumption by a factor of 12 and to improve its reliability by a factor of 8.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
Subtitle of host publicationSmarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1082-1085
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781509028092
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 13 2017
Event39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2017 - Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of
Duration: Jul 11 2017Jul 15 2017

Other

Other39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2017
CountryKorea, Republic of
CityJeju Island
Period7/11/177/15/17

Fingerprint

Neurons
Electric power utilization
Cochlear implants
Equipment and Supplies
Pulse generators
Prosthetics
Brain
Neural Inhibition
Electrodes
Technology
Cochlear Implants
Spinal Cord
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Fridman, G. Y. (2017). Safe Direct Current Stimulator design for reduced power consumption and increased reliability. In 2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Smarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings (pp. 1082-1085). [8037015] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2017.8037015

Safe Direct Current Stimulator design for reduced power consumption and increased reliability. / Fridman, Gene Y.

2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Smarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. p. 1082-1085 8037015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Fridman, GY 2017, Safe Direct Current Stimulator design for reduced power consumption and increased reliability. in 2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Smarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings., 8037015, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 1082-1085, 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2017, Jeju Island, Korea, Republic of, 7/11/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2017.8037015
Fridman GY. Safe Direct Current Stimulator design for reduced power consumption and increased reliability. In 2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Smarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. p. 1082-1085. 8037015 https://doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2017.8037015
Fridman, Gene Y. / Safe Direct Current Stimulator design for reduced power consumption and increased reliability. 2017 39th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society: Smarter Technology for a Healthier World, EMBC 2017 - Proceedings. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. pp. 1082-1085
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