Rural-to-Urban Migration: Socioeconomic Status But Not Acculturation was Associated with Overweight/Obesity Risk

Angela Hilmers, Antonio Bernabé-Ortiz, Robert H. Gilman, Ann Y. McDermott, Liam Smeeth, J. Jaime Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To investigate whether socioeconomic status (SES) and acculturation predict overweight/obesity risk as well as the mediating effect of physical activity (PA) in the context of internal migration. Cross-sectional study of 587 rural-to-urban migrants participating in the PERU MIGRANT study. Analyses were conducted using logistic regression and structured equation modeling. Interaction effects of SES and acculturation were tested. Models were controlled for age, gender and education. Only SES was a significant predictor of overweight/obesity risk. Lower SES decreased the odds of being overweight/obese by 51.4 %. This association did not vary by gender nor was it explained by PA. Mechanisms underlying the relationship between SES and overweight/obesity may differ depending on the geographic location and sociocultural context of the population studied. Research on internal migration and health would benefit from the development of tailored acculturation measures and the evaluation of exploratory models that include diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)644-651
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Latin America
  • Migration
  • Physical activity
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Rural-to-Urban Migration: Socioeconomic Status But Not Acculturation was Associated with Overweight/Obesity Risk'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this