Rural-to-urban migration and risk of hypertension: longitudinal results of the PERU MIGRANT study

A. Bernabe-Ortiz, J. F. Sanchez, R. M. Carrillo-Larco, Robert H Gilman, J. A. Poterico, R. Quispe, L. Smeeth, J. J. Miranda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Urbanization can be detrimental to health in populations due to changes in dietary and physical activity patterns. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of migration on the incidence of hypertension. Participants of the PERU MIGRANT study, that is, rural, urban and rural-to-urban migrants, were re-evaluated after 5 years after baseline assessment. The outcome was incidence of hypertension; and the exposures were study group and other well-known risk factors. Incidence rates, relative risks (RRs) and population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated. At baseline, 201 (20.4%), 589 (59.5%) and 199 (20.1%) participants were rural, rural-to-urban migrant and urban subjects, respectively. Overall mean age was 47.9 (s.d.±12.0) years, and 522 (52.9%) were female. Hypertension prevalence at baseline was 16.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.7–18.3), being more common in urban group; whereas pre-hypertension was more prevalent in rural participants (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Human Hypertension
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 11 2016

Fingerprint

Population Dynamics
Hypertension
Incidence
Prehypertension
Urbanization
Population
Confidence Intervals
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Bernabe-Ortiz, A., Sanchez, J. F., Carrillo-Larco, R. M., Gilman, R. H., Poterico, J. A., Quispe, R., ... Miranda, J. J. (Accepted/In press). Rural-to-urban migration and risk of hypertension: longitudinal results of the PERU MIGRANT study. Journal of Human Hypertension. https://doi.org/10.1038/jhh.2015.124

Rural-to-urban migration and risk of hypertension : longitudinal results of the PERU MIGRANT study. / Bernabe-Ortiz, A.; Sanchez, J. F.; Carrillo-Larco, R. M.; Gilman, Robert H; Poterico, J. A.; Quispe, R.; Smeeth, L.; Miranda, J. J.

In: Journal of Human Hypertension, 11.02.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bernabe-Ortiz, A. ; Sanchez, J. F. ; Carrillo-Larco, R. M. ; Gilman, Robert H ; Poterico, J. A. ; Quispe, R. ; Smeeth, L. ; Miranda, J. J. / Rural-to-urban migration and risk of hypertension : longitudinal results of the PERU MIGRANT study. In: Journal of Human Hypertension. 2016.
@article{d27ebdbfd2ca40cb8a143eba77311b29,
title = "Rural-to-urban migration and risk of hypertension: longitudinal results of the PERU MIGRANT study",
abstract = "Urbanization can be detrimental to health in populations due to changes in dietary and physical activity patterns. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of migration on the incidence of hypertension. Participants of the PERU MIGRANT study, that is, rural, urban and rural-to-urban migrants, were re-evaluated after 5 years after baseline assessment. The outcome was incidence of hypertension; and the exposures were study group and other well-known risk factors. Incidence rates, relative risks (RRs) and population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated. At baseline, 201 (20.4{\%}), 589 (59.5{\%}) and 199 (20.1{\%}) participants were rural, rural-to-urban migrant and urban subjects, respectively. Overall mean age was 47.9 (s.d.±12.0) years, and 522 (52.9{\%}) were female. Hypertension prevalence at baseline was 16.0{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 13.7–18.3), being more common in urban group; whereas pre-hypertension was more prevalent in rural participants (P",
author = "A. Bernabe-Ortiz and Sanchez, {J. F.} and Carrillo-Larco, {R. M.} and Gilman, {Robert H} and Poterico, {J. A.} and R. Quispe and L. Smeeth and Miranda, {J. J.}",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1038/jhh.2015.124",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Journal of Human Hypertension",
issn = "0950-9240",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Rural-to-urban migration and risk of hypertension

T2 - longitudinal results of the PERU MIGRANT study

AU - Bernabe-Ortiz, A.

AU - Sanchez, J. F.

AU - Carrillo-Larco, R. M.

AU - Gilman, Robert H

AU - Poterico, J. A.

AU - Quispe, R.

AU - Smeeth, L.

AU - Miranda, J. J.

PY - 2016/2/11

Y1 - 2016/2/11

N2 - Urbanization can be detrimental to health in populations due to changes in dietary and physical activity patterns. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of migration on the incidence of hypertension. Participants of the PERU MIGRANT study, that is, rural, urban and rural-to-urban migrants, were re-evaluated after 5 years after baseline assessment. The outcome was incidence of hypertension; and the exposures were study group and other well-known risk factors. Incidence rates, relative risks (RRs) and population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated. At baseline, 201 (20.4%), 589 (59.5%) and 199 (20.1%) participants were rural, rural-to-urban migrant and urban subjects, respectively. Overall mean age was 47.9 (s.d.±12.0) years, and 522 (52.9%) were female. Hypertension prevalence at baseline was 16.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.7–18.3), being more common in urban group; whereas pre-hypertension was more prevalent in rural participants (P

AB - Urbanization can be detrimental to health in populations due to changes in dietary and physical activity patterns. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of migration on the incidence of hypertension. Participants of the PERU MIGRANT study, that is, rural, urban and rural-to-urban migrants, were re-evaluated after 5 years after baseline assessment. The outcome was incidence of hypertension; and the exposures were study group and other well-known risk factors. Incidence rates, relative risks (RRs) and population attributable fractions (PAFs) were calculated. At baseline, 201 (20.4%), 589 (59.5%) and 199 (20.1%) participants were rural, rural-to-urban migrant and urban subjects, respectively. Overall mean age was 47.9 (s.d.±12.0) years, and 522 (52.9%) were female. Hypertension prevalence at baseline was 16.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.7–18.3), being more common in urban group; whereas pre-hypertension was more prevalent in rural participants (P

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84957812562&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84957812562&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/jhh.2015.124

DO - 10.1038/jhh.2015.124

M3 - Article

C2 - 26865219

AN - SCOPUS:84957812562

JO - Journal of Human Hypertension

JF - Journal of Human Hypertension

SN - 0950-9240

ER -