Rumination and suicidal ideation: The moderating roles of hope and optimism

Raymond P. Tucker, La Ricka R. Wingate, Victoria M. O'Keefe, Adam C. Mills, Kathy Rasmussen, Collin L. Davidson, De Mond M. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The current study aimed to investigate whether the correlation between rumination and suicidal ideation is moderated by the presence of hope and optimism. It was hypothesized that both hope and optimism would moderate (weaken) the relationship between rumination and suicidal ideation. Two hundred and ninety-eight participants completed self-report measures of hope, optimism, rumination (brooding and reflection), and depression. Results demonstrated that both hope and optimism weakened the relationship between rumination and suicidal ideation, as well as the relationships between both subscales of rumination and suicidal thinking. These results were found when controlling for symptoms of depression. Results suggest that a ruminative thinking style may be most harmful when an absence of hope or optimism is also present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)606-611
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume55
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Brooding
  • Hope
  • Optimism
  • Rumination
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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