Rufinamide for generalized seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

T. Glauser, G. Kluger, R. Sachdeo, G. Krauss, C. Perdomo, S. Arroyo

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Abstract

Background: Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a catastrophic pediatric epilepsy syndrome characterized by multiple types of treatment-resistant seizures and high rates of seizure-related injury. Current available treatments are inadequate, leaving patients with few treatment options and opportunities. Methods: We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the antiepileptic drug rufinamide in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Eligible patients between 4 and 30 years of age had multiple types of seizures (including tonic-atonic and atypical absence seizures) with a minimum of 90 seizures in the month before baseline and a recent history of a slow spike-and-wave pattern on EEG. Results: After a 28-day baseline period, 139 eligible patients were randomized; 138 patients received either rufinamide (n = 74) or placebo (n = 64) in addition to their other antiepileptic drugs. The median percentage reduction in total seizure frequency was greater in the rufinamide therapy group than in the placebo group (32.7% vs 11.7%, p = 0.0015). There was a difference (p < 0.0001) in tonic-atonic ("drop attack") seizure frequency with rufinamide (42.5% median percentage reduction) vs placebo (1.4% increase). The rufinamide group had a greater improvement in seizure severity (p = 0.0041) and a higher 50% responder rate compared with placebo for total seizures (p = 0.0045) and tonic-atonic seizures (p = 0.002). The common adverse events (reported by ≥10% of patients receiving rufinamide) were somnolence (24.3% with rufinamide vs 12.5% with placebo) and vomiting (21.6% vs 6.3%). Conclusions: Rufinamide was an effective and well-tolerated treatment for seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1950-1958
Number of pages9
JournalNeurology
Volume70
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - May 20 2008

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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