Routinization of HIV Testing in an Inpatient Setting: A Systematic Process for Organizational Change

Jamie L. Mignano, Lucy Miner, Christina Cafeo, Derek E. Spencer, Mangla Gulati, Travis Brown, Ruth Borkoski, Kate Gibson-Magri, Jenna Canzoniero, Jonathan E. Gottlieb, Lisa Rowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2006, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released revised recommendations for routinization of HIV testing in healthcare settings. Health professionals have been challenged to incorporate these guidelines. In March 2013, a routine HIV testing initiative was launched at a large urban academic medical center in a high prevalence region. The goal was to routinize HIV testing by achieving a 75% offer and 75% acceptance rate and promoting linkage to care in the inpatient setting. A systematic six-step organizational change process included stakeholder buy-in, identification of an interdisciplinary leadership team, infrastructure development, staff education, implementation, and continuous quality improvement. Success was measured by monitoring the percentage of offered and accepted HIV tests from March to December 2013. The targeted offer rate was exceeded consistently once nurses became part of the consent process (September 2013). Fifteen persons were newly diagnosed with HIV. Seventy-eight persons were identified as previously diagnosed with HIV, but not engaged in care. Through this process, patients who may have remained undiagnosed or out-of-care were identified and linked to care. The authors propose that this process can be replicated in other settings. Increasing identification and treatment will improve the individual patient's health and reduce community disease burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e10-e18
JournalJournal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • HIV testing
  • interdisciplinary collaboration
  • organizational change

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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