Routine surveillance for infections in nursing homes: Experience at two facilities

David Vlahov, James H. Tenney, Karen W. Cervino, Dolores K. Shamer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Because the feasibility and usefulness of routine surveillance for infections in nursing homes has been questioned, we reviewed the elements of infection surveillance programs developed by two nursing homes using existing personnel. Although infection definitions and data collection methods differed between the two homes, both homes identified urinary and respiratory tract infections as the major endemic problems at their institutions and demonstrated important clusters of gastrointestinal tract and eye infections. Surveillance data were used (1) to identify individual patients who required follow-up by physicians, (2) to justify special infection control measures for clusters of gastrointestinal tract and eye infections, and (3) to provide the basis for in-service education in infection control. Routine surveillance for infections is both feasible and an integral and valuable part of overall infection control programs at two large Maryland nursing homes.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)47-53
    Number of pages7
    JournalAJIC: American Journal of Infection Control
    Volume15
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Apr 1987

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Epidemiology
    • Health Policy
    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Infectious Diseases

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