Routes of drug administration, differential affiliation, and lifestyle stability among cocaine and opiate users: Implications to HIV prevention

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Abstract

Types of drugs used and routes of administration were assessed, and correlations to social affiliation, HIV status, and lifestyle stability were explored among 672 street-recruited drug users in Baltimore. Participants reported 63 patterns of drug use, which were categorized into five groups: (1) only sniff heroin; (2) smoke crack and may snort cocaine; (3) sniff heroin and smoke crack; (4) inject heroin and cocaine; and (5) inject heroin and cocaine, smoke crack, and may snort heroin. Social network analysis revealed that heroin sniffers and crack smokers both tended to associate with those with similar drug use patterns. High symptoms of drug dependence were observed among heroin users irrespective of mode of administration. Injectors reported higher rates of hospitalization compared to noninjectors even after adjusting for HIV status. Implications to HIV prevention and drug use transitions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-102
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of substance abuse
Volume13
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Keywords

  • Crack cocaine
  • Differential affiliation
  • Drug dependence
  • HIV
  • Heroin
  • Routes of administration
  • Social networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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