Rotavirus genotypes associated with acute diarrhea in Egyptian infants

Salwa F. Ahmed, Adel M. Mansour, John D. Klena, Tupur S. Husain, Khaled A. Hassan, Farag Mohamed, Duncan Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Before the introduction of rotavirus vaccine in Egypt, information on the burden of disease and the circulating rotavirus genotypes is critical to monitor vaccine effectiveness. METHODS:: A cohort of 348 Egyptian children was followed from birth to 2 years of age with twice-weekly home visits to detect diarrheal illness. VP7 and VP4 genes were genotyped by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing. RESULTS:: Forty percentage of children had rotavirus-associated diarrhea at least once by their second birthday. One hundred and twelve children experienced a single rotavirus diarrheal episodes (RDE) at a median age of 9 months; while 27 infants had their second RDE at a median age of 15 months and 1 infant had 3 RDE at the age of 2, 16 and 22 months. Of the 169 RDE, 82% could be assigned a G-type, while 58% had been identified a P-type. The most prevalent genotype was G2 (32%), followed by G1 (24%) and G9 (19%). G2P[4] rotavirus episodes were significantly associated with fever (P = 0.03) and vomiting (P = 0.06) when compared with other genotypes. G2 strains were the predominant genotype causing 50% of the second RDE while G9 represented 25% of the second RDE. CONCLUSIONS:: Genotypes identified are similar to those detected globally except for absence of G4. Our finding that 75% of the second RDE were due to G2 and G9 indicates a possible reduction in natural protection afforded by these types compared with G1, where 90% of G1 cases did not experience a second xposure, indicating greater protection against recurrent symptomatic infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume33
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rotavirus
Diarrhea
Genotype
Rotavirus Vaccines
House Calls
Egypt
DNA Sequence Analysis
Reverse Transcription
Vomiting
Fever
Vaccines
Parturition
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • diarrhea
  • Egypt
  • genotypes
  • rotavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Ahmed, S. F., Mansour, A. M., Klena, J. D., Husain, T. S., Hassan, K. A., Mohamed, F., & Steele, D. (2014). Rotavirus genotypes associated with acute diarrhea in Egyptian infants. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 33(SUPPL. 1). https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000052

Rotavirus genotypes associated with acute diarrhea in Egyptian infants. / Ahmed, Salwa F.; Mansour, Adel M.; Klena, John D.; Husain, Tupur S.; Hassan, Khaled A.; Mohamed, Farag; Steele, Duncan.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 33, No. SUPPL. 1, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ahmed, SF, Mansour, AM, Klena, JD, Husain, TS, Hassan, KA, Mohamed, F & Steele, D 2014, 'Rotavirus genotypes associated with acute diarrhea in Egyptian infants', Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 33, no. SUPPL. 1. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000052
Ahmed, Salwa F. ; Mansour, Adel M. ; Klena, John D. ; Husain, Tupur S. ; Hassan, Khaled A. ; Mohamed, Farag ; Steele, Duncan. / Rotavirus genotypes associated with acute diarrhea in Egyptian infants. In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 2014 ; Vol. 33, No. SUPPL. 1.
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