Role of the cervical lymph nodes as a barrier to metastatic tumor

R. Robinson Baker, Sumner Wood, Pham Van Cong, Soo Tae Kim, Vernon T. Tolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The results of these experiments in rabbi's indicate that 1 × 106 tumor cells are uniformly fatal when injected intravenously. In contrast, the same dose of tumor cells is not necessarily fatal when injected intralymphatically. Arrest within a lymph node occurred in less than 50 per cent of the animals and the ability to contain tumor within the node decreased with time. A radical neck dissection did not significantly reduce the variable barrier effect which was assumed by small regenerated lymphatic vessels and nodes in the dissected side of the neck or by intact nodes in the contralateral side of the neck.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)654-659
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume118
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1969
Externally publishedYes

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Lymph Nodes
Neck
Clergy
Neoplasms
Lymphatic Vessels
Neck Dissection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Baker, R. R., Wood, S., Van Cong, P., Kim, S. T., & Tolo, V. T. (1969). Role of the cervical lymph nodes as a barrier to metastatic tumor. American Journal of Surgery, 118(5), 654-659.

Role of the cervical lymph nodes as a barrier to metastatic tumor. / Baker, R. Robinson; Wood, Sumner; Van Cong, Pham; Kim, Soo Tae; Tolo, Vernon T.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 118, No. 5, 11.1969, p. 654-659.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, RR, Wood, S, Van Cong, P, Kim, ST & Tolo, VT 1969, 'Role of the cervical lymph nodes as a barrier to metastatic tumor', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 118, no. 5, pp. 654-659.
Baker RR, Wood S, Van Cong P, Kim ST, Tolo VT. Role of the cervical lymph nodes as a barrier to metastatic tumor. American Journal of Surgery. 1969 Nov;118(5):654-659.
Baker, R. Robinson ; Wood, Sumner ; Van Cong, Pham ; Kim, Soo Tae ; Tolo, Vernon T. / Role of the cervical lymph nodes as a barrier to metastatic tumor. In: American Journal of Surgery. 1969 ; Vol. 118, No. 5. pp. 654-659.
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