Role of Structural Marginalization, HIV Stigma, and Mistrust on HIV Prevention and Treatment among Young Black Latinx Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women: Perspectives from Youth Service Providers

Renata Arrington-Sanders, Kimberly Hailey-Fair, Andrea L. Wirtz, Anthony Morgan, Durryle Brooks, Marne Castillo, Connie Trexler, Jennafer Kwait, Nadia Dowshen, Noya Galai, Chris Beyrer, David Celentano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Young black and Latinx men who have sex with men (YBLMSM) and transgender women (YBLTW) are disproportionately impacted by HIV. Structural and social marginalization, the social barriers, and structures that unevenly distribute benefits and burdens to different groups, may contribute to inability for youth to access prevention and treatment care services. Yet, few reports have examined the community and health care experiences of social marginalization among youth service providers who have multiple roles in the community (i.e., serve as a service provider and are a member or prior member of the YBLMSM and YBLTW population). Eighteen key informants (KIs), defined as youth, young adults, or adults who were members of or connected to the YBLMSM and young black and Latinx transgender (YBLTG) community, participated in a one-time, face-to-face, or telephone key informant interview (KII) lasting ∼45 min. KIs were defined as youth service providers because they described working with the target population and either being a member of or closely connected to the target population. KIs described key themes related to marginalization: lack of competent care among health care providers and both clinical and community spaces that left out key populations. HIV stigma and medical mistrust continues to create a barrier to care in this population and for interventions to be effective interventions will need to use an intersectional approach that simultaneously address all identities, and the social and structural needs of youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-15
Number of pages9
JournalAIDS patient care and STDs
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

Keywords

  • HIV
  • YBLMSM
  • YBLTW
  • structural marginalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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