Role of S fimbriae in Escherichia coli K1 binding to brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and penetration into the central nervous system in vivo

Ying Wang, Zhang Guang Wen, Kwang Sik Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bacterial binding to host cell surface is considered an important initial step in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases including meningitis. Previous studies using a laboratory Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain HB101 possessing a recombinant plasmid carrying the cloned S fimbriae gene cluster have shown that S fimbriae are the major contributor to binding to bovine brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) for HB101. Our present study, however, revealed that S fimbriae did not play a major role for E. coli K1's binding to human BMEC in vitro and crossing of the blood-brain barrier in vivo. This was shown by our demonstration that E. coli K1 strain and its S fimbriae-operon deletion mutant exhibited similar rates of binding to human BMEC and similar rates of penetration into the central nervous system in the experimental hematogenous meningitis model. Studies are needed to identify major determinants of E. coli K1 contributing to BMEC binding and subsequent crossing of the blood-brain barrier in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-293
Number of pages7
JournalMicrobial Pathogenesis
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2004

Keywords

  • Binding
  • Blood-brain barrier
  • E. coli
  • Human brain endothelial cell
  • Meningitis
  • S fimbriae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Role of S fimbriae in Escherichia coli K1 binding to brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and penetration into the central nervous system in vivo'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this