Role of oxidized human plasma low density lipoproteins in atherosclerosis: effects on smooth muscle cell proliferation

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Abstract

The effects of oxidized human plasma low density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL) on the proliferation of cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was studied, employing viable cell counting, [3H] thymidine incorporation into DNA, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the medium. Oxidized LDL (prepared by incubation of LDL with copper sulfate) exerted a concentration-dependent stimulation (2 fold, compared to control) of aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation at low concentrations (0.1 μg - 10 μg/ml medium). On the other hand, at high concentrations (25-200 μg/ml), Ox-LDL produced a pronounced decrease in viable cells, a decrease in the incorporation of [3H] thymidine into DNA, and an increase in the release of LDH in the medium. In this report, the previously postulated biological roles of oxidized-LDL in atherosclerosis are discussed in view of these findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-147
Number of pages5
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Volume111
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1992

Keywords

  • atherosclerosis
  • oxidized low density lipoproteins
  • smooth muscle cell proliferation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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