Role of mononuclear phagocytes and accessory cells in human immunodeficiency virus type I infection of the brain

M. Popovic, W. Mellert, V. Erfle, S. Gartner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The cells responsible for persistence of viral infection in the brains of human immunodeficiency virus type I-positive individuals are most likely mononuclear phagocytes. The infection of other cell types within the brain is presumably the results of close interactions with HIV-I-producing cells of the mononuclear phagocytic lineage. During these interactions, both direct effects from HIV-I infection of brain cells as well as indirect mechanisms (namely the response of brain cells to the presence of virus-infected cells, particularly monocytes and macrophages) should be considered. In addition, the genomic variability of HIV-I could play a role in increasing the tropism of the virus for certain cell types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume23
Issue numberSUPPL.
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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