Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans

P. R. Williamson, M. A. Huber, J. E. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two isoenzymes of maltase (EC 3.2.1.20) were purified to homogeneity from Candida albicans. Isoenzymes I and II were found to have apparent molecular masses of 63 and 66 kDa on SDS/PAGE with isoelectric points of 5.0 and 4.6 respectively. Both isoenzymes resembled each other in similar N-terminal sequence, specificity for the α(1→4) glycosidic linkage and immune cross-reactivity on Western blots using a maltase II antigen-purified rabbit antibody. Maltase was induced by growth on sucrose whereas β-fructofuranosidase activity could not be detected under similar conditions. Maltase I and II were shown to be unglycosylated enzymes by neutral sugar assay, and more than 90% of α-glucosidase activity was recoverable from spheroplasts. These data, in combination with other results from this laboratory showing lack of a plausible leader sequence in genomic or mRNA transcripts, suggest an intracellular localization of the enzyme. To establish further the mechanism of sucrose assimilation by maltase, the existence of a sucrose-inducible H+/sucrose syn-transporter was demonstrated by (1) the kinetics of sucrose-induced [14C]sucrose uptake, (2) recovery of intact [14C]sucrose from ground cells by t.l.c. and (3) transport of 0.83 mol of H+/mol of [14C]sucrose. In total, the above is consistent with a mechanism whereby sucrose is transported into C. albicans to be hydrolysed by an intracellular maltase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)765-771
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume291
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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alpha-Glucosidases
Candida
Candida albicans
Sucrose
Isoenzymes
Spheroplasts
Glucosidases
Isoelectric Point
Molecular mass
Enzymes
Sugars
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Assays
Western Blotting
Rabbits
Antigens
Recovery
Messenger RNA
Kinetics
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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Williamson, P. R., Huber, M. A., & Bennett, J. E. (1993). Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans. Biochemical Journal, 291(3), 765-771.

Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans. / Williamson, P. R.; Huber, M. A.; Bennett, J. E.

In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 291, No. 3, 1993, p. 765-771.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williamson, PR, Huber, MA & Bennett, JE 1993, 'Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans', Biochemical Journal, vol. 291, no. 3, pp. 765-771.
Williamson PR, Huber MA, Bennett JE. Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans. Biochemical Journal. 1993;291(3):765-771.
Williamson, P. R. ; Huber, M. A. ; Bennett, J. E. / Role of maltase in the utilization of sucrose by Candida albicans. In: Biochemical Journal. 1993 ; Vol. 291, No. 3. pp. 765-771.
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