Role of intestinal fluid in restitution of blood volume and plasma protein after hemorrhage in awake rats

D. N. Darlington, R. O. Jones, T. A. Magnuson, D. S. Gann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

To determine whether food and/or water in the gastrointestinal tract affects restitution of blood volume and plasma protein after hemorrhage, fed and 24-h-fasted awake rats received a 20 ml · kg -1 · 3 min-1 hemorrhage, and restitution of blood volume was measured by Evans blue dye and dilution of hematocrit. Restitution of blood volume and plasma protein in fed rats was complete by 2-4 h. In contrast, restitution was severely attenuated in fasted rats and was not complete by 24 h. Because initial blood volume was significantly lower in the fasted rats (55.4 ± 1.7 vs. 64.9 ± 2.5 ml/kg in fed), the percent blood lost during hemorrhage was significantly greater (36 vs. 31%). However, the attenuated restitution was not the result of the larger hemorrhage, as fed rats receiving a 36% hemorrhage also restored blood volume completely by 4 h. In fasted rats, complete restitution of blood volume did occur when either water or food and water were given 4 h after hemorrhage. Gastrointestinal water content fell (from 65.5 ± 4.8 to 47.9 ± 1.6 ml/kg) 2 h after hemorrhage in fed but not in fasted rats (33.5 ± 2.4 to 30.6 ± 2.5 ml/kg). These data suggest that gastrointestinal fluid is essential for complete restoration of blood volume in the awake rat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R715-R722
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume268
Issue number3 37-3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • arterial blood pressure
  • fasting
  • gut water
  • organ water
  • plasma glucose
  • plasma osmolality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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