Role of Hsp90 in systemic lupus erythematosus and its clinical relevance

Hem Shukla, Paula M. Pitha

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Heat shock proteins (HSP) are a family of ubiquitous and phylogenically highly conserved proteins which play an essential role as molecular chaperones in protein folding and transport. Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is not mandatory for the biogenesis of most proteins, rather it participate in structural maturation and conformational regulation of a number of signaling molecules and transcription factors. Hsp90 has been shown to play an important role in antigen presentation, activation of lymphocytes, macrophages, maturation of dendritic cells, and in the enhanceosome mediated induction of inflammation. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with complex immunological and clinical manifestations. Dysregulated expression of Type I interferon α, activation of B cells and production of autoantibodies are hallmarks of SLE. The enhanced levels of Hsp90 were detected in the serum of SLE patients. The elevated level of Hsp90 in SLE has also been correlated with increased levels of IL-6 and presence of autoantibodies to Hsp90. This suggests that Hsp90 may contribute to the inflammation and disease progression and that targeting of Hsp 90 expression may be a potential treatment of SLE. The pharmacologic inhibition of Hsp90 was successfully applied in mouse models of autoimmune encephalomyelitis and SLElike autoimmune diseases. Thus targeting Hsp90 may be an effective treatment for SLE, especially if combined with other targeted therapeutic approaches.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number728605
JournalAutoimmune Diseases
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 29 2012

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HSP90 Heat-Shock Proteins
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Autoantibodies
Autoimmune Diseases
Inflammation
Encephalomyelitis
Interferon Type I
Molecular Chaperones
Macrophage Activation
Protein Folding
Antigen Presentation
Protein Transport
Lymphocyte Activation
Heat-Shock Proteins
Dendritic Cells
Disease Progression
Interleukin-6
Proteins
B-Lymphocytes
Transcription Factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology and Microbiology (miscellaneous)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Role of Hsp90 in systemic lupus erythematosus and its clinical relevance. / Shukla, Hem; Pitha, Paula M.

In: Autoimmune Diseases, Vol. 1, No. 1, 728605, 29.10.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Shukla, Hem ; Pitha, Paula M. / Role of Hsp90 in systemic lupus erythematosus and its clinical relevance. In: Autoimmune Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 1, No. 1.
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