Role of endogenous testosterone concentration in pediatric stroke

Sandra Normann, Gabrielle De Veber, Manfred Fobker, Claus Langer, Gili Kenet, Timothy J. Bernard, Barbara Fiedler, Ronald Sträter, Neil Goldenberg, Ulrike Nowak-Göttl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Previous studies have indicated a male predominance in pediatric stroke. To elucidate this gender disparity, total testosterone concentration was measured in children with arterial ischemic stroke (AIS; n = 72), children with cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT; n = 52), and 109 healthy controls. Testosterone levels above the 90th percentile for age and gender were documented in 10 children with AIS (13.9%) and 10 with CSVT (19.2%), totaling 16.7% of patients with cerebral thromboembolism overall, as compared with only 2 of 109 controls (1.8%; p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis with adjustment for total cholesterol level, hematocrit, and pubertal status, elevated testosterone was independently associated with increased disease risk (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: overall = 3.98 [1.38-11.45]; AIS = 3.88 [1.13-13.35]; CSVT = 5.50 [1.65-18.32]). Further adjusted analyses revealed that, for each 1nmol/l increase in testosterone in boys, the odds of cerebral thromboembolism were increased 1.3-fold.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)754-758
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Testosterone
Stroke
Pediatrics
Thromboembolism
Odds Ratio
Intracranial Thrombosis
Hematocrit
Multivariate Analysis
Cholesterol
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Normann, S., De Veber, G., Fobker, M., Langer, C., Kenet, G., Bernard, T. J., ... Nowak-Göttl, U. (2009). Role of endogenous testosterone concentration in pediatric stroke. Annals of Neurology, 66(6), 754-758. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.21840

Role of endogenous testosterone concentration in pediatric stroke. / Normann, Sandra; De Veber, Gabrielle; Fobker, Manfred; Langer, Claus; Kenet, Gili; Bernard, Timothy J.; Fiedler, Barbara; Sträter, Ronald; Goldenberg, Neil; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 66, No. 6, 12.2009, p. 754-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Normann, S, De Veber, G, Fobker, M, Langer, C, Kenet, G, Bernard, TJ, Fiedler, B, Sträter, R, Goldenberg, N & Nowak-Göttl, U 2009, 'Role of endogenous testosterone concentration in pediatric stroke', Annals of Neurology, vol. 66, no. 6, pp. 754-758. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.21840
Normann S, De Veber G, Fobker M, Langer C, Kenet G, Bernard TJ et al. Role of endogenous testosterone concentration in pediatric stroke. Annals of Neurology. 2009 Dec;66(6):754-758. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.21840
Normann, Sandra ; De Veber, Gabrielle ; Fobker, Manfred ; Langer, Claus ; Kenet, Gili ; Bernard, Timothy J. ; Fiedler, Barbara ; Sträter, Ronald ; Goldenberg, Neil ; Nowak-Göttl, Ulrike. / Role of endogenous testosterone concentration in pediatric stroke. In: Annals of Neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 66, No. 6. pp. 754-758.
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