Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities

Cara M. Altimus, Ali D. Güler, Nazia M. Alam, A. Cyrus Arman, Glen T. Prusky, Alapakkam P. Sampath, Samer Hattar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In mammals, synchronization of the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus is achieved through direct input from the eyes conveyed by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Circadian photoentrainment can be maintained by rod and cone photoreceptors, but their functional contributions and their retinal circuits that impinge on ipRGCs are not well understood. Using mice that lack functional rods or in which rods are the only functional photoreceptors, we found that rods were solely responsible for photoentrainment at scotopic light intensities. Rods were also capable of driving circadian photoentrainment at photopic intensities at which they were incapable of supporting a visually guided behavior. Using mice in which cone photoreceptors were ablated, we found that rods signal through cones at high light intensities, but not at low light intensities. Thus, rods use two distinct retinal circuits to drive ipRGC function to support circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1112
Number of pages6
JournalNature Neuroscience
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells
Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells
Light
Retinal Ganglion Cells
Vertebrate Photoreceptor Cells
Hypothalamus
Mammals
Drive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Altimus, C. M., Güler, A. D., Alam, N. M., Arman, A. C., Prusky, G. T., Sampath, A. P., & Hattar, S. (2010). Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. Nature Neuroscience, 13(9), 1107-1112. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2617

Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. / Altimus, Cara M.; Güler, Ali D.; Alam, Nazia M.; Arman, A. Cyrus; Prusky, Glen T.; Sampath, Alapakkam P.; Hattar, Samer.

In: Nature Neuroscience, Vol. 13, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 1107-1112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Altimus, CM, Güler, AD, Alam, NM, Arman, AC, Prusky, GT, Sampath, AP & Hattar, S 2010, 'Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities', Nature Neuroscience, vol. 13, no. 9, pp. 1107-1112. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2617
Altimus CM, Güler AD, Alam NM, Arman AC, Prusky GT, Sampath AP et al. Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. Nature Neuroscience. 2010 Sep;13(9):1107-1112. https://doi.org/10.1038/nn.2617
Altimus, Cara M. ; Güler, Ali D. ; Alam, Nazia M. ; Arman, A. Cyrus ; Prusky, Glen T. ; Sampath, Alapakkam P. ; Hattar, Samer. / Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. In: Nature Neuroscience. 2010 ; Vol. 13, No. 9. pp. 1107-1112.
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