Robbing Host Phosphatidic Acid to Survive: A Strategy of a Fly Parasite

Research output: Contribution to journalShort surveypeer-review

Abstract

Drosophila flies can be infected by an obligate fungal intracellular parasite, Tubulinosema ratisbonensis, resulting in a swollen abdomen and often death. Within the fly, the parasite multiplies in the cytoplasm of adipocytes of the fat body, feeds on host lipid droplets, and has a specific requirement for dietary phosphatidic acid.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-338
Number of pages3
JournalTrends in parasitology
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2019

Keywords

  • host phosphatidic acid
  • intracellular parasitism
  • microsporidia–Drosophila interaction
  • nutrient salvage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

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