Road Traffic Injuries in Kenya

The Health Burden and Risk Factors in Two Districts

Abdulgafoor M Bachani, Pranali Koradia, Hadley K. Herbert, Stephen Mogere, Daniel Akungah, Jackim Nyamari, Eric Osoro, William Maina, Kent A Stevens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Road traffic injuries (RTIs) contribute to a significant proportion of the burden of disease in Kenya. They also have a significant impact on the social and economic well-being of individuals, their families, and society. However, though estimates quantifying the burden of RTIs in Kenya do exist, most of these studies date back to the early 2000s-more than one decade ago. Objective: This article aims to present the current status of road safety in Kenya. Using data from the police and vital registration systems in Kenya, we present the current epidemiology of RTIs in the nation. We also sought to assess the status of 3 well-known risk factors for RTIs-speeding and the use of helmets and reflective clothing. Methods: Data for this study were collected in 2 steps. The first step involved the collection of secondary data from the Kenya traffic police as well as the National Vital Registration System to assess the current trends of RTIs in Kenya. Following this, observational studies were conducted in the Thika and Naivasha districts in Kenya to assess the current status of speeding among all vehicles and the use of helmets and reflective clothing among motorcyclists. Results: The overall RTI rate in Kenya was 59.96 per 100,000 population in 2009, with vehicle passengers being the most affected. Notably, injuries to motorcyclists increased at an annual rate of approximately 29 percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 27-32; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-30
Number of pages7
JournalTraffic Injury Prevention
Volume13
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Kenya
Law enforcement
road traffic
Health
district
Epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries
health
registration system
Head Protective Devices
Economics
Clothing
Police
clothing
police
epidemiology
Observational Studies
confidence
well-being
road

Keywords

  • Helmets
  • Kenya
  • Reflective clothing
  • Road safety
  • Road traffic injuries
  • Speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Safety Research

Cite this

Road Traffic Injuries in Kenya : The Health Burden and Risk Factors in Two Districts. / Bachani, Abdulgafoor M; Koradia, Pranali; Herbert, Hadley K.; Mogere, Stephen; Akungah, Daniel; Nyamari, Jackim; Osoro, Eric; Maina, William; Stevens, Kent A.

In: Traffic Injury Prevention, Vol. 13, No. SUPPL. 1, 03.2012, p. 24-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bachani, AM, Koradia, P, Herbert, HK, Mogere, S, Akungah, D, Nyamari, J, Osoro, E, Maina, W & Stevens, KA 2012, 'Road Traffic Injuries in Kenya: The Health Burden and Risk Factors in Two Districts', Traffic Injury Prevention, vol. 13, no. SUPPL. 1, pp. 24-30. https://doi.org/10.1080/15389588.2011.633136
Bachani, Abdulgafoor M ; Koradia, Pranali ; Herbert, Hadley K. ; Mogere, Stephen ; Akungah, Daniel ; Nyamari, Jackim ; Osoro, Eric ; Maina, William ; Stevens, Kent A. / Road Traffic Injuries in Kenya : The Health Burden and Risk Factors in Two Districts. In: Traffic Injury Prevention. 2012 ; Vol. 13, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 24-30.
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