Risperidon zur behandlung aggressiv-impulsiven verhaltens bei kindern und jugendlichen mit intelligenz im unteren durchschnittsbereich, lernbehinderung und leichter geistiger behinderung

Translated title of the contribution: Risperidone for treatment of aggressive-impulsive behaviour in children and adolescents with low-average-intelligence, learning disability and mild mental disorder

Jörg M. Fegert, R. Findling, G. DeSmedt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present study reports on an interim-analysis of 319 patients of a long-term study about application of risperidone for treatment of so-called disruptive behaviour according to DSM-IV. 319 patients were included in the study (266 boys and 53 girls). The median age was 10 years with a range of 4-14 years. All 319 patients were treated with an average dose of 1.64 mg per day (standard deviation ± 0,04 mg per day). The range lay between 0.2 and 4.0 mg per day (corresponding to a dose of 0.021 ± 0.001 mg per kg per day). The period of investigation spanned a year. Under this treatment the patients showed a significant increase in social behaviour and a significant decrease in problematic behaviour over the whole year. At large, the treatment was well tolerated. Only 22 patients had to be excluded from the study. Side effects like increase in prolactin or gain in weight are reported on in the following.

Translated title of the contributionRisperidone for treatment of aggressive-impulsive behaviour in children and adolescents with low-average-intelligence, learning disability and mild mental disorder
Original languageGerman
Pages (from-to)93-97
Number of pages5
JournalNervenheilkunde
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2003

Keywords

  • Aggressive behaviour disorder
  • Atypical neuroleptics
  • Mental retardation
  • Risperidon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Family Practice

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