Risperidone Added to Psychostimulant in Children with Severe Aggression and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Lack of Effect on Attention and Short-Term Memory

Cristan A. Farmer, Jeffery N. Epstein, Robert L. Findling, Kenneth D. Gadow, L. Eugene Arnold, Heidi Kipp, David J. Kolko, Eric Butter, Jayne Schneider, Oscar G. Bukstein, Nora K. McNamara, Brooke S.G. Molina, Michael G. Aman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Professionals have periodically expressed concern that atypical antipsychotics may cause cognitive blunting in treated patients. In this study, we report data from a double-blind, randomized, controlled study of stimulant plus placebo versus combined stimulant and risperidone to evaluate the effects of the atypical antipsychotic on attention and short-term memory. Methods: A total of 165 (n = 83 combined treatment; n = 82 stimulant plus placebo) children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and severe physical aggression, aged 6-12 years, were evaluated with Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CPT-II) and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-III (WISC) Digit Span subscale at baseline, after 3 weeks of stimulant-only treatment, and after six additional weeks of randomized treatment (stimulant+placebo vs. stimulant+risperidone). Results: At 3 weeks, improvement on CPT-II performance (Commissions and Reaction Time Standard Error; p < 0.001) and on Digit Span memory performance (p < 0.006) was noted for the full sample. At study week 9, no difference in CPT-II or Digit Span performance was observed between the randomized groups (ps = 0.41 to 0.83). Conclusions: Similar to other studies, we found no deleterious effects on attention and short-term memory associated with short-term use of risperidone. NCT00796302.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-124
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • CNS stimulants
  • Conduct disorder
  • Oppositional defiant disorder
  • Risperidone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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