Risperidone added to parent training and stimulant medication: Effects on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and peer aggression

Kenneth D. Gadow, L. Eugene Arnold, Brooke S.G. Molina, Robert L. Findling, Oscar G. Bukstein, Nicole V. Brown, Nora K. McNamara, E. Victoria Rundberg-Rivera, Xiaobai Li, Heidi L. Kipp, Jayne Schneider, Cristan A. Farmer, Jennifer L. Baker, Joyce Sprafkin, Robert R. Rice, Srihari S. Bangalore, Eric M. Butter, Kristin A. Buchan-Page, Elizabeth A. Hurt, Adrienne B. AustinSabrina N. Grondhuis, Michael G. Aman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective In this study, we aimed to expand on our prior research into the relative efficacy of combining parent training, stimulant medication, and placebo (Basic therapy) versus parent training, stimulant, and risperidone (Augmented therapy) by examining treatment effects for attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms and peer aggression, symptom-induced impairment, and informant discrepancy. Method Children (6-12 years of age; N = 168) with severe physical aggression, ADHD, and co-occurring ODD/CD received an open trial of parent training and stimulant medication for 3 weeks. Participants failing to show optimal clinical response were randomly assigned to Basic or Augmented therapy for an additional 6 weeks. Results Compared with Basic therapy, children receiving Augmented therapy experienced greater reduction in parent-rated ODD severity (p =.002, Cohen's d = 0.27) and peer aggression (p =.02, Cohen's d = 0.32) but not ADHD or CD symptoms. Fewer children receiving Augmented (16%) than Basic (40%) therapy were rated by their parents as impaired by ODD symptoms at week 9/endpoint (p =.008). Teacher ratings indicated greater reduction in ADHD severity (p =.02, Cohen's d = 0.61) with Augmented therapy, but not for ODD or CD symptoms or peer aggression. Although both interventions were associated with marked symptom reduction, a relatively large percentage of children were rated as impaired for at least 1 targeted disorder at week 9/endpoint by parents (Basic 47%; Augmented 27%) and teachers (Basic 48%; Augmented 38%). Conclusion Augmented therapy was superior to Basic therapy in reducing severity of ADHD and ODD symptoms, peer aggression, and symptom-induced impairment, but clinical improvement was generally context specific, and effect sizes ranged from small to moderate. Clinical trial registration information - Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (The TOSCA Study); http://clinicaltrails.gov/; NCT00796302.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)948-959.e1
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume53
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • aggression
  • multiple drug therapy
  • risperidone
  • stimulant drug

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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