Risks of treating leprosy in a General Hospital

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors comment on the paper of Mathai, Rao and Job, 'Risks of Treating Leprosy in a General Hospital'. Based upon their analysis of the data in this paper, it would appear that while there may be a small increased risk of developing clinical leprosy in persons caring for leprosy patients in a general hospital setting when no isolation practices are utilized, the increased risk, if present, is fairly small. It is quite possible that minimal isolation procedures directed at infectious cases early in their hospitalization would obviate this risk. It is noteworthy that the Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A., at present makes no recommendation concerning isolation techniques to be used for the hospital care of patients with leprosy. This emphasizes the lack of good data on this issue. The authors feel that the treatment of leprosy patients in a general hospital is medically sound and will go a long way toward ensuring better care for such patients. Whether brief periods of isolation when chemotherapy is being instituted, or an initial brief period of chemotherapy of newly diagnosed cases on an outpatient basis, would further reduce the small risks associated with caring for infectious patients is not clear at present.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-415
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Leprosy
Volume51
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Leprosy
General Hospitals
Patient Care
Drug Therapy
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Hospitalization
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Risks of treating leprosy in a General Hospital. / Nelson, Kenrad Edwin; Schauf, V.

In: International Journal of Leprosy, Vol. 51, No. 3, 1983, p. 413-415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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