Risks of municipal solid waste incineration: an environmental perspective

R. A. Denison, Ellen Silbergeld

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Discusses the need to expand incinerator risk assessment beyond the limited view of incinerators as stationary air pollution sources to encompass the following: other products of incineration, ash in particular, and pollutants other than dioxins, metals in particular; routes of exposure in addition to direct inhalation; health effects in addition to cancer; and the cumulative nature of exposure and health effects induced by many incinerator-associated pollutants. Rational MSW management planning requires that the limitations as well as advantages of incineration be recognized. Incineration is a waste-processing - not a waste disposal - technology, and its products pose substantial management and disposal problems of their own. In particular, incineration greatly enhances the mobility and bioavailability of toxic metals present in MSW. Risk considerations dictate that alternatives to the use of toxic metals at the production stage also be examined in designing an effective, long-term MSW management strategy. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRisk Analysis
Pages343-355
Number of pages13
Volume8
Edition3
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Waste incineration
Refuse incinerators
Municipal solid waste
incineration
pollutant
municipal solid waste
waste processing
Ashes
management planning
waste disposal
air pollution
Metals
health
management
Health
risk assessment
Incineration
cancer
Air pollution
Waste disposal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Denison, R. A., & Silbergeld, E. (1988). Risks of municipal solid waste incineration: an environmental perspective. In Risk Analysis (3 ed., Vol. 8, pp. 343-355)

Risks of municipal solid waste incineration : an environmental perspective. / Denison, R. A.; Silbergeld, Ellen.

Risk Analysis. Vol. 8 3. ed. 1988. p. 343-355.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Denison, RA & Silbergeld, E 1988, Risks of municipal solid waste incineration: an environmental perspective. in Risk Analysis. 3 edn, vol. 8, pp. 343-355.
Denison RA, Silbergeld E. Risks of municipal solid waste incineration: an environmental perspective. In Risk Analysis. 3 ed. Vol. 8. 1988. p. 343-355
Denison, R. A. ; Silbergeld, Ellen. / Risks of municipal solid waste incineration : an environmental perspective. Risk Analysis. Vol. 8 3. ed. 1988. pp. 343-355
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