Risk of end-stage renal disease in Japanese patients with chronic kidney disease increases proportionately to decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate

Kunihiro Matsushita, Jingsha Chen, Yingying Sang, Shoshana Ballew, Ryutaro Shimazaki, Masafumi Fukagawa, Enyu Imai, Josef Coresh, Akira Hishida

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Predominantly based on North American and European studies, 30% to 40% declines in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over a few years are strongly associated with the risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and have been proposed as surrogate endpoints of ESRD for clinical research. However, this association has not been systematically quantified in Asian populations. To do this we studied adult Japanese patients with baseline eGFR 10–59 ml/min/1.73m2. Changes in eGFR from baseline measured by centrally assessed serum creatinine were linked to subsequent ESRD in 2410 patients after one year and in 2079 patients after year 2. After year 1, 1.4% experienced a 53% decrease in eGFR (equivalent to doubling of serum creatinine), whereas 4.3% and 9.7% had eGFR decrease of 40% or 30% or more, respectively. The corresponding numbers after 2 years were 4.2%, 10.9%, and 19.3%, respectively. After year 1 baseline period, 498 patients developed ESRD over a median follow-up of 2.9 years (365 ESRD cases over a median follow-up of 2 years after year 2). In year 1, after accounting for potential confounders, a strong linear association was found between eGFR declines and subsequent ESRD, with adjusted hazard ratios of 20.7 (95% confidence interval 14.3-30.1) for a 53% decrease, 9.6 (7.4–12.5) for a 40% decrease, and 5.3 (4.1–6.9) for a 30% decrease compared to no change. Corresponding hazard ratios for year two analysis were 17.3 (11.8–25.3), 6.5 (4.7–9.1), and 3.1 (2.2–4.4), respectively. The associations were consistent across demographics and kidney diseases. Thus, 30% to 40% declines in eGFR are strongly associated with the risk of ESRD in Japanese patients with reduced eGFR, broadening global implications as a surrogate endpoint in clinical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1114
Number of pages6
JournalKidney International
Volume90
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Keywords

  • chronic kidney disease progression
  • end-stage renal disease
  • glomerular filtration rate
  • prospective study
  • surrogate endpoints

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nephrology

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