RISK FACTORS FOR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG CHILDREN 1-24 MONTHS OLD IN KINSHASA, ZAIRE

JonathanM Mann, Farzin Davachi, Thomas C Quinn, Ngaly Bosenge, Peter Piot, PanguKaza Asila, Henry Francis, Paola Baudoux, Nzila Nzilambi, RobertL Colebunders, Ndoko Kabote, Miatudila Malonga, JamesW Curran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A prevalence study of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was conducted in Kinshasa, Zaïre, among 258 children 2-24 months old who were in hospital, 191 children 1-20 months old who were attending a well-child clinic, and their mothers. 8 % of the mothers of both groups of children were seropositive. Among children under 9 months old, 12 of 102 (12%) hospital inpatients and 11 of 136 (8%) clinic attenders were seropositive, while in the 9-24-month age group 20 of 156 (13%) hospital children and only 1 of 55 (2%) clinic children were seropositive (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.01). 61 % of the seropositive children had seropositive mothers, indicating a high rate of vertical transmission. Factors associated with seropositivity among hospital children with seronegative mothers included male sex, increased lifetime number of medical injections, and previous blood transfusion or hospital admission. Among children who had not previously been transfused or admitted to hospital the seropositives had received more medical injections than the seronegatives (median 34.5 versus 14.5; Wilcoxon rank sum test, p = 0.006). HIV infection accounted for or complicated a substantial proportion of hospital paediatric admissions. Public health measures are urgently required to prevent parenteral and vertical transmission of HIV to infants and young children in Kinshasa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)654-657
Number of pages4
JournalThe Lancet
Volume328
Issue number8508
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 20 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Democratic Republic of the Congo
HIV
Mothers
Nonparametric Statistics
Injections
Pediatric Hospitals
Virus Diseases
Blood Transfusion
Inpatients
Public Health
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

RISK FACTORS FOR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG CHILDREN 1-24 MONTHS OLD IN KINSHASA, ZAIRE. / Mann, JonathanM; Davachi, Farzin; Quinn, Thomas C; Bosenge, Ngaly; Piot, Peter; Asila, PanguKaza; Francis, Henry; Baudoux, Paola; Nzilambi, Nzila; Colebunders, RobertL; Kabote, Ndoko; Malonga, Miatudila; Curran, JamesW.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 328, No. 8508, 20.09.1986, p. 654-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mann, J, Davachi, F, Quinn, TC, Bosenge, N, Piot, P, Asila, P, Francis, H, Baudoux, P, Nzilambi, N, Colebunders, R, Kabote, N, Malonga, M & Curran, J 1986, 'RISK FACTORS FOR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG CHILDREN 1-24 MONTHS OLD IN KINSHASA, ZAIRE', The Lancet, vol. 328, no. 8508, pp. 654-657. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(86)90167-4
Mann, JonathanM ; Davachi, Farzin ; Quinn, Thomas C ; Bosenge, Ngaly ; Piot, Peter ; Asila, PanguKaza ; Francis, Henry ; Baudoux, Paola ; Nzilambi, Nzila ; Colebunders, RobertL ; Kabote, Ndoko ; Malonga, Miatudila ; Curran, JamesW. / RISK FACTORS FOR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG CHILDREN 1-24 MONTHS OLD IN KINSHASA, ZAIRE. In: The Lancet. 1986 ; Vol. 328, No. 8508. pp. 654-657.
@article{1b9c7dff6dc94a6aac7ecfbd5c1a7cf1,
title = "RISK FACTORS FOR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG CHILDREN 1-24 MONTHS OLD IN KINSHASA, ZAIRE",
abstract = "A prevalence study of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was conducted in Kinshasa, Za{\"i}re, among 258 children 2-24 months old who were in hospital, 191 children 1-20 months old who were attending a well-child clinic, and their mothers. 8 {\%} of the mothers of both groups of children were seropositive. Among children under 9 months old, 12 of 102 (12{\%}) hospital inpatients and 11 of 136 (8{\%}) clinic attenders were seropositive, while in the 9-24-month age group 20 of 156 (13{\%}) hospital children and only 1 of 55 (2{\%}) clinic children were seropositive (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.01). 61 {\%} of the seropositive children had seropositive mothers, indicating a high rate of vertical transmission. Factors associated with seropositivity among hospital children with seronegative mothers included male sex, increased lifetime number of medical injections, and previous blood transfusion or hospital admission. Among children who had not previously been transfused or admitted to hospital the seropositives had received more medical injections than the seronegatives (median 34.5 versus 14.5; Wilcoxon rank sum test, p = 0.006). HIV infection accounted for or complicated a substantial proportion of hospital paediatric admissions. Public health measures are urgently required to prevent parenteral and vertical transmission of HIV to infants and young children in Kinshasa.",
author = "JonathanM Mann and Farzin Davachi and Quinn, {Thomas C} and Ngaly Bosenge and Peter Piot and PanguKaza Asila and Henry Francis and Paola Baudoux and Nzila Nzilambi and RobertL Colebunders and Ndoko Kabote and Miatudila Malonga and JamesW Curran",
year = "1986",
month = "9",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1016/S0140-6736(86)90167-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "328",
pages = "654--657",
journal = "The Lancet",
issn = "0140-6736",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "8508",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - RISK FACTORS FOR HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG CHILDREN 1-24 MONTHS OLD IN KINSHASA, ZAIRE

AU - Mann, JonathanM

AU - Davachi, Farzin

AU - Quinn, Thomas C

AU - Bosenge, Ngaly

AU - Piot, Peter

AU - Asila, PanguKaza

AU - Francis, Henry

AU - Baudoux, Paola

AU - Nzilambi, Nzila

AU - Colebunders, RobertL

AU - Kabote, Ndoko

AU - Malonga, Miatudila

AU - Curran, JamesW

PY - 1986/9/20

Y1 - 1986/9/20

N2 - A prevalence study of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was conducted in Kinshasa, Zaïre, among 258 children 2-24 months old who were in hospital, 191 children 1-20 months old who were attending a well-child clinic, and their mothers. 8 % of the mothers of both groups of children were seropositive. Among children under 9 months old, 12 of 102 (12%) hospital inpatients and 11 of 136 (8%) clinic attenders were seropositive, while in the 9-24-month age group 20 of 156 (13%) hospital children and only 1 of 55 (2%) clinic children were seropositive (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.01). 61 % of the seropositive children had seropositive mothers, indicating a high rate of vertical transmission. Factors associated with seropositivity among hospital children with seronegative mothers included male sex, increased lifetime number of medical injections, and previous blood transfusion or hospital admission. Among children who had not previously been transfused or admitted to hospital the seropositives had received more medical injections than the seronegatives (median 34.5 versus 14.5; Wilcoxon rank sum test, p = 0.006). HIV infection accounted for or complicated a substantial proportion of hospital paediatric admissions. Public health measures are urgently required to prevent parenteral and vertical transmission of HIV to infants and young children in Kinshasa.

AB - A prevalence study of antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was conducted in Kinshasa, Zaïre, among 258 children 2-24 months old who were in hospital, 191 children 1-20 months old who were attending a well-child clinic, and their mothers. 8 % of the mothers of both groups of children were seropositive. Among children under 9 months old, 12 of 102 (12%) hospital inpatients and 11 of 136 (8%) clinic attenders were seropositive, while in the 9-24-month age group 20 of 156 (13%) hospital children and only 1 of 55 (2%) clinic children were seropositive (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.01). 61 % of the seropositive children had seropositive mothers, indicating a high rate of vertical transmission. Factors associated with seropositivity among hospital children with seronegative mothers included male sex, increased lifetime number of medical injections, and previous blood transfusion or hospital admission. Among children who had not previously been transfused or admitted to hospital the seropositives had received more medical injections than the seronegatives (median 34.5 versus 14.5; Wilcoxon rank sum test, p = 0.006). HIV infection accounted for or complicated a substantial proportion of hospital paediatric admissions. Public health measures are urgently required to prevent parenteral and vertical transmission of HIV to infants and young children in Kinshasa.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0022496521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0022496521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0140-6736(86)90167-4

DO - 10.1016/S0140-6736(86)90167-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 2876136

AN - SCOPUS:0022496521

VL - 328

SP - 654

EP - 657

JO - The Lancet

JF - The Lancet

SN - 0140-6736

IS - 8508

ER -