Risk factors for elevated intraocular pressure after the use of intraocular gases in vitreoretinal surgery

Philip P. Chen, John T. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The authors studied the contribution of multiple factors, including gas type and concentration, to postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation following vitreoretinal surgery with intraocular gas. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred seventy-one eyes of 134 patients were retrospectively investigated after vitreoretinal surgery using air, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) (10%-30%), or perfluoropropane (C3F8) (5%- 35%). RESULTS: IOPs greater than 25 mm Hg occurred in 74 of 171 eyes (43%). Elevated IOP was associated with increasing patient age (P < .001), expansile gas concentrations (P < .001), use of C3F8 (P = .01), and circumferential scleral buckles (P = .04). Most IOP elevations (65 eyes, 88%) occurred within 24 hours and responded to aqueous suppression within 24 to 72 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Transient IOP elevation is common following vitreoretinal surgery. Although it is responsive to treatment, it may pose a risk to some eyes. Prophylactic treatment should be considered in high-risk eyes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-42
Number of pages6
JournalOphthalmic Surgery and Lasers
Volume28
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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