Risk factors and clinical impact of central line infections in the surgical intensive care unit

Charalambos Charalambous, Sandra M. Swoboda, James Dick, Trish Perl, Pamela A Lipsett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine the risk factors and clinical impact of central line infections in critically ill surgical patients. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: The surgical intensive care unit of a large tertiary care university hospital. Patients: A total of 232 consecutive central line catheters sent for culture from patients in a surgical intensive care unit during 1996 and 1997. Catheters were sent for microbiologic analysis when the patient was clinically infected and the central line was a possible source. Interventions: None. Main Outcome Measures: Risk factors associated and clinical impact of a positive catheter culture. Results: Of 232 consecutive catheters from 93 patients sent for microbiologic analysis, 114 catheters (49%) had no growth, 40 (17%) were colonized ( dialysis > fluid > nutrition, P = .006), placement in the operating room vs the intensive care unit (P = .02), and placement of a new catheter (> guide wire, > new site, P = .003) were all significant factors. Surprisingly, neither the number of lumens nor the duration of the catheter in situ were predictors when a catheter was suspected and not proved infected compared with a suspected and proved catheter infection. In the multiple regression model, the placement of the catheter in the internal jugular position was the single most important predictor of a catheter infection (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1241-1246
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume133
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1998

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Critical Care
Intensive Care Units
Catheters
Infection
Tertiary Healthcare
Operating Rooms
Critical Illness
Dialysis
Neck
Retrospective Studies
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Risk factors and clinical impact of central line infections in the surgical intensive care unit. / Charalambous, Charalambos; Swoboda, Sandra M.; Dick, James; Perl, Trish; Lipsett, Pamela A.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 133, No. 11, 1998, p. 1241-1246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charalambous, C, Swoboda, SM, Dick, J, Perl, T & Lipsett, PA 1998, 'Risk factors and clinical impact of central line infections in the surgical intensive care unit', Archives of Surgery, vol. 133, no. 11, pp. 1241-1246.
Charalambous, Charalambos ; Swoboda, Sandra M. ; Dick, James ; Perl, Trish ; Lipsett, Pamela A. / Risk factors and clinical impact of central line infections in the surgical intensive care unit. In: Archives of Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 133, No. 11. pp. 1241-1246.
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