Risk Characterization for Nanotechnology

Richard A. Williams, Kristen M. Kulinowski, Ronald White, Garrick Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Nanotechnology is a broad term that encompasses materials, structures, or processes that utilize engineered nanomaterials, which can be defined as materials intentionally designed to have one or more dimensions between 1 and 100 nm. Historically, risk characterization has been viewed as the final phase of a risk assessment process that integrates hazard identification, dose-response assessment, and exposure assessment. The novelty and diversity of materials, structures, and tools that are covered by above-defined "nanotechnology" raise substantial methodological issues and pose significant challenges for each of these phases of risk assessment. These issues and challenges culminate in the risk characterization phase of the risk assessment process, and this article discusses several of these key issues and approaches to developing risk characterization results and their implications for risk management decision making that are specific to nanotechnology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1671-1679
Number of pages9
JournalRisk Analysis
Volume30
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology
  • Risk
  • Risk assessment
  • Risk characterization
  • Risk management
  • Risk-benefit tradeoff

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Physiology (medical)

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  • Cite this

    Williams, R. A., Kulinowski, K. M., White, R., & Louis, G. (2010). Risk Characterization for Nanotechnology. Risk Analysis, 30(11), 1671-1679. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1539-6924.2010.01513.x