Risk behaviors, medical care, and chlamydial infection among young men in the United States

Leighton Ku, Michael St. Louis, Carol Farshy, Sevgi Aral, Charles F. Turner, Laura D. Lindberg, Freya Sonenstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. This study assessed factors related to chlamydial infection among young men in the United States. Methods. Data were from interviews of nationally representative samples of 470 men aged 18 to 19 years (teenagers) and 995 men aged 22 to 26 years (young adults) and from urine specimens tested by means of polymerase chain reaction. Results. Although a majority of the men reported occasional unprotected intercourse, only a minority perceived themselves to be at risk for contracting a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Chlamydial infection was detected in 3.1% of the teenagers and 4.5% of the young adults. A minority of those infected had symptoms or had been tested for STDs; very few had been diagnosed with STDs. Conclusions. Chlamydial infection is common but usually asymptomatic and undiagnosed. Primary and secondary prevention efforts should be increased, particularly among young adult men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1140-1143
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume92
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Risk behaviors, medical care, and chlamydial infection among young men in the United States'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this