Risk and protection for HIV/AIDS in African-American, Hispanic, and White adolescents.

Robin Bartlett, Raymond Buck, Mona M. Shattell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

African-Americans and Hispanics are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in the United States. HIV infection is often acquired during adolescence, a time when risky sexual behaviors are at their peak. This study explored relationships among selected risk factors, protective factors, and risky sexual behaviors among African-American, Hispanic, and White adolescents, from a sample of adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. African-Americans and Hispanics were more likely to have sexual intercourse without the use of birth control than were Whites. African-Americans were more likely to have sexual behavior with multiple sexual partners than either Hispanics or Whites were, and African-Americans had higher self-esteem than did Hispanics and Whites. In order to develop culturally sensitive, effective interventions to prevent HIV/AIDS in adolescents, racial differences in risk and protective factors must be examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-25
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of National Black Nurses' Association : JNBNA
Volume19
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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