Review of the current literature as a preparatory tool for the trauma content of the orthopaedic in-training examination

Payam Farjoodi, David R. Marker, Jeremy R. McCallum IV, Frank J. Frassica, Simon C. Mears

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Currently, the only standardized evaluation of trauma knowledge throughout orthopedic training is found in the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination, which is administered annually to all residents by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Our goals were to assess the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination to (1) determine the content of the trauma questions, (2) identify the content of the 3 most frequently referenced journals on the answer keys, and (3) evaluate the correlation between those contents. We reviewed the trauma-related Orthopaedic In-Training Examination questions and answer keys for 2002 through 2007. Content for test questions and cited literature was assessed with the same criteria: (1) category type, (2) anatomic location, (3) orthopedic focus, and (4) treatment type. For each of the 3 most frequently referenced journals, we weighted content by dividing the number of times it was referenced by the number of its trauma-related articles. We then compared the journal data individually and collectively to the data from the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination trauma questions. A chi-square analysis with Yates correction was used to determine differences. Questions and literature were similar in the most frequently addressed items in each of the 4 areas: category type (taxonomy 3, treatment), 52.4% and 60.7%, respectively; anatomic location (femur), 23.3% and 27.7%, respectively; orthopedic focus (fracture), 51.0% and 56.5%, respectively; and treatment type (multiple/nonspecific), 39.0% and 35.4%, respectively. The content correlation found between the questions and literature supports the idea that reviewing current literature may help prepare for the trauma content on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOrthopedics
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

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Orthopedics
Wounds and Injuries
Femur

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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Review of the current literature as a preparatory tool for the trauma content of the orthopaedic in-training examination. / Farjoodi, Payam; Marker, David R.; McCallum IV, Jeremy R.; Frassica, Frank J.; Mears, Simon C.

In: Orthopedics, Vol. 34, No. 5, 05.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farjoodi, Payam ; Marker, David R. ; McCallum IV, Jeremy R. ; Frassica, Frank J. ; Mears, Simon C. / Review of the current literature as a preparatory tool for the trauma content of the orthopaedic in-training examination. In: Orthopedics. 2011 ; Vol. 34, No. 5.
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