RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF MORTALITY IN GIANT PACIFIC OCTOPUS (ENTEROCTOPUS DOFLEINI)

Kathryn E. Seeley, Leigh A. Clayton, Catherine A. Hadfield, Dillon Muth, Joseph L Mankowski, Kathleen M. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) is a popular exhibit species in public display aquaria, but information on health and disease is limited. This retrospective review evaluates time in collection and describes antemortem clinical signs and pathology of giant Pacific octopuses in an aquarium setting. Between March 2004 and December 2013, there were 19 mortalities: eight males, 10 females, and one individual whose sex was not recorded. Average time spent in collection for all octopuses was 375 ± 173 days (males 351 ± 148 days, females 410 ± 196 days). Ten (52.6%) of the octopuses were sexually mature at the time of death, six (31.6%) were not sexually mature, and reproductive status could not be determined in three octopuses (15.8%). Minimal changes were noted on gross necropsy but branchitis was histologically evident in 14 octopuses, often in conjunction with amoeboid or flagellate parasites. Senescence, parasitism, and husbandry were all important contributors to mortality and should be considered when caring for captive octopuses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-274
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Octopodiformes
Octopodidae
Mortality
aquariums
Data Display
Clinical Pathology
necropsy
parasitism
Parasites
death
parasites
gender
Health

Keywords

  • Cephalopods
  • Enteroctopus dofleini
  • giant Pacific octopus
  • Ichthyobodo

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF MORTALITY IN GIANT PACIFIC OCTOPUS (ENTEROCTOPUS DOFLEINI). / Seeley, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Leigh A.; Hadfield, Catherine A.; Muth, Dillon; Mankowski, Joseph L; Kelly, Kathleen M.

In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 47, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 271-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seeley, Kathryn E. ; Clayton, Leigh A. ; Hadfield, Catherine A. ; Muth, Dillon ; Mankowski, Joseph L ; Kelly, Kathleen M. / RETROSPECTIVE REVIEW OF MORTALITY IN GIANT PACIFIC OCTOPUS (ENTEROCTOPUS DOFLEINI). In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine. 2016 ; Vol. 47, No. 1. pp. 271-274.
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