Retinochoroidal morphology described by wide-field montage imaging of spectral domain optical coherence tomography

Keisuke Mori, Junji Kanno, Peter L. Gehlbach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To present baseline images of the vitreous, retina, and choroid from the macula to the periphery in normal patients using a novel montaging technique of spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Methods: Twenty-six normal eyes of 22 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Montaged images of four radial optical coherence tomography scans through the fovea were obtained from each subject. Results: In the macula, there were six identifiable retinal layers as well as four bands in the outer retina. In the periphery, the ganglion cell layer was not identifiable. The external limiting membrane, the second band, and the retinal pigment epithelium were continuously delineated from the macula to the periphery. The third band was not visible in the periphery. Conclusion: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography montaged images provide wide-angle images of the vitreous, retina, and choroid, allowing for evaluation of peripheral findings and examination of relationships between peripheral and posterior disease. The maximum scan length achieved here was 36 mm. The scan length is approximately three times than that provided by conventional posterior scanning and is consistent with known dimensions of the eye. This method is achievable with current commercially available devices and may contribute to decision making in clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-384
Number of pages10
JournalRetina
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Keywords

  • montaged images
  • normal retinochoroidal structure
  • spectral domain optical coherence tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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