Retention of women enrolled in a prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus infection

Impact of race, unstable housing, and use of human immunodeficiency virus therapy

Nancy A. Hessol, Michael Schneider, Ruth M. Greenblatt, Melanie Bacon, Yvonne Barranday, Susan Holman, Esther Robison, Carolyn Williams, Mardge Cohen, Kathleen Weber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Even though women and people of color represent an increasing proportion of US acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) cases, few research studies include adequate representation of these populations. Here the authors describe recruitment and retention of a diverse group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and at risk HIV-uninfected women in a prospective study operating in six sites across the United States. Methods used to minimize loss to follow-up in this cohort are also described. For the first 10 study visits that occurred during a 5-year period between 1994 and 1999, the retention rate of participants was approximately 82%. In adjusted Cox analysis, factors associated with retention among all women were older age, African-American race, stable housing, HIV-infected serostatus, past experience in studies of HIV/AIDS, and site of enrollment. In an adjusted Cox analysis of HIV-infected women, African-American race, past experience in studies of HIV/AIDS, site of enrollment, and reported use of combination or highly active antiretroviral HIV therapy at the last visit were significantly associated with retention. In adjusted Cox analysis of HIV-uninfected study participants, only the site of enrollment was significantly associated with study retention. These results show that women with and at risk for HIV infection, especially African-American women, can be successfully recruited and retained in prospective studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-573
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume154
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2001

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Virus Diseases
HIV
Prospective Studies
African Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Therapeutics
Statistical Factor Analysis
Color
Research

Keywords

  • Cohort studies
  • HIV
  • Prospective studies
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Retention of women enrolled in a prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus infection : Impact of race, unstable housing, and use of human immunodeficiency virus therapy. / Hessol, Nancy A.; Schneider, Michael; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Bacon, Melanie; Barranday, Yvonne; Holman, Susan; Robison, Esther; Williams, Carolyn; Cohen, Mardge; Weber, Kathleen.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 154, No. 6, 15.09.2001, p. 563-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hessol, Nancy A. ; Schneider, Michael ; Greenblatt, Ruth M. ; Bacon, Melanie ; Barranday, Yvonne ; Holman, Susan ; Robison, Esther ; Williams, Carolyn ; Cohen, Mardge ; Weber, Kathleen. / Retention of women enrolled in a prospective study of human immunodeficiency virus infection : Impact of race, unstable housing, and use of human immunodeficiency virus therapy. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2001 ; Vol. 154, No. 6. pp. 563-573.
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