Resveratrol levels and all-cause mortality in older community-dwelling adults

Richard D. Semba, Luigi Ferrucci, Benedetta Bartali, Mireia Urpí-Sarda, Raul Zamora-Ros, Kai Sun, Antonio Cherubini, Stefania Bandinelli, Cristina Andres-Lacueva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes, red wine, chocolate, and certain berries and roots, is considered to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects in humans and is related to longevity in some lower organisms. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether resveratrol levels achieved with diet are associated with inflammation, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and mortality in humans. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study, the Invecchiare in Chianti (InCHIANTI) Study ("Aging in the Chianti Region"), 1998 to 2009 conducted in 2 villages in the Chianti area in a population-based sample of 783 community-dwelling men and women 65 years or older. EXPOSURES: Twenty-four-hour urinary resveratrol metabolites. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcome measurewas all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were markers of inflammation (serum C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin [IL]-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]) and prevalent and incident cancer and cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Mean (95%CI) log total urinary resveratrol metabolite concentrations were 7.08 (6.69-7.48) nmol/g of creatinine. During 9 years of follow-up, 268 (34.3%) of the participants died. From the lowest to the highest quartile of baseline total urinary resveratrol metabolites, the proportion of participants who died from all causes was 34.4%, 31.6%, 33.5%, and 37.4%, respectively (P = .67). Participants in the lowest quartile had a hazards ratio for mortality of 0.80 (95%CI, 0.54-1.17) compared with those in the highest quartile of total urinary resveratrol in a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for potential confounders. Resveratrol levels were not significantly associated with serum CRP, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF, prevalent or incident cardiovascular disease, or cancer. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In older community-dwelling adults, total urinary resveratrol metabolite concentration was not associated with inflammatory markers, cardiovascular disease, or cancer or predictive of all-cause mortality. Resveratrol levels achieved with a Western diet did not have a substantial influence on health status and mortality risk of the population in this study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1077-1084
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA internal medicine
Volume174
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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    Semba, R. D., Ferrucci, L., Bartali, B., Urpí-Sarda, M., Zamora-Ros, R., Sun, K., Cherubini, A., Bandinelli, S., & Andres-Lacueva, C. (2014). Resveratrol levels and all-cause mortality in older community-dwelling adults. JAMA internal medicine, 174(7), 1077-1084. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2014.1582