Results of Bladder Neck Reconstruction After Newborn Complete Primary Repair of Exstrophy

John P. Gearhart, Andrew Baird, Caleb P. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: We describe the results of modified Young-Dees-Leadbetter bladder neck reconstruction to achieve continence in patients who underwent complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy as newborns. Materials and Methods: Using the Johns Hopkins Exstrophy Database we identified patients who underwent bladder neck reconstruction after having undergone complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy as newborns. We determined patient characteristics and surgical outcomes. Results: A total of 30 males and 3 females were referred after complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy, of whom 26 underwent bladder neck reconstruction. Results of complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy were strongly associated with osteotomy use. Of the patients 19 (58%), including 16 males and 3 females, who underwent complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy without osteotomy had complications (dehiscence and bladder prolapse), while none of 14 male patients who underwent complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy with osteotomy had complications, although none were subsequently continent. Of the 19 patients who had complications after complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy 12 underwent bladder neck reconstruction and total continence was achieved in only 3 (25%). Of the 14 patients with successful complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy 8 (57%) are dry day and night, 4 (28%) are dry during the day and wet at night, and 2 (14%) are completely incontinent. Continent children underwent successful complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy with pelvic osteotomy, all underwent hypospadias repair before age 1 year and none required ureteral reimplantation before bladder neck reconstruction. Conclusions: Many patients who undergo newborn complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy will require bladder neck reconstruction. Bladder neck reconstruction is more successful in those in whom complete primary repair of bladder exstrophy was successful. As in all types of repair, failed initial closure usually results in a bladder that is unsuitable for bladder neck reconstruction. These patients often require bladder augmentation and a continent stoma to be dry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1619-1622
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume178
Issue number4 SUPPLEMENT
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Keywords

  • abnormalities
  • bladder exstrophy
  • osteotomy
  • reconstructive surgical procedures
  • urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Results of Bladder Neck Reconstruction After Newborn Complete Primary Repair of Exstrophy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this