Results and factors affecting outcome of revision surgery for shoulder instability

Robert E. Meehan, Steve Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We conducted a clinical study identifying the causes of failure and the variables affecting outcome in 28 patients with failed open or arthroscopic anterior shoulder reconstruction for anterior glenohumeral instability. All patients underwent an open revision stabilization procedure. Surgical outcomes at a minimum 24 months' follow-up were available in 25 patients. The most common findings at revision surgery were capsular redundancy and Bankart lesions. Satisfactory results were found in 21 patients (84%) after repeat instability surgery. Factors contributing to negative outcome were glenohumeral arthritis, age greater than 30 years, 2 or more previous instability procedures, a bony Bankart lesion, the diagnosis of multidirectional instability, and surgery involving the nondominant arm (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-37
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005

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Reoperation
Arthritis
Arm
Bankart Lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Results and factors affecting outcome of revision surgery for shoulder instability. / Meehan, Robert E.; Petersen, Steve.

In: Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 31-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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