Restoration of fusion in children with intracranial tumors and incomitant strabismus

Benjamin Shalev, Michael X. Repka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: Intracranial tumors may cause eye misalignment and interruption of sensory fusion. The ocular misalignment may be permanent or may be corrected after tumor treatment with or without specific strabismus treatment. This report analyzes the binocular vision outcome of children with misaligned eyes from brain tumors who regain orthotropia. Design: A retrospective noncomparative case series. Participants: Twenty-three surviving children less than 18 years of age with a new heterotropia and absence of fusion associated with the development of a brain tumor. Interventions: Tumor resection/radiation/chemotherapy and necessary strabismus management. Main Outcome Measure: Stereopsis (≥ 4 of 10 circles) measured with the Randot II stereo test at near fixation. Results: Fourteen children regained orthotropia either after tumor therapy, strabismus treatment, or both. Ten of these 14 children with realigned vision regained high-grade stereovision. Nine patients did not regain orthotropia and were excluded. The mean age at tumor diagnosis of the fusing group was 9.9 years (range, 3-17 years) compared with 8.5 years (range, 6-12 years) in the four realigned nonfusing patients. The mean duration of misalignment was 12 months (range, 2-51 months) for the fusing group, and 45 months (range, 14-120 months) for the nonfusing group. Conclusions: Children and adolescents with brain tumor-associated eye misalignment may regain the ability to fuse if their misalignment can be corrected. An improved prognosis was noted for those patients when the misalignment had been present for a shorter duration. These data suggest that the outcome may be better for incomitant strabismus than that reported for acute comitant esotropia. (C) 2000 American Academy of Ophthalmology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1880-1883
Number of pages4
JournalOphthalmology
Volume107
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 24 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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